Honda Jazz Features, Specifications & Performance

Honda Jazz Overview

The new Honda Jazz 2018 was not showcased at the 2018 Auto Expo. As part of their multiple car onslaught in India, Honda will be upgrading its popular hatchback.Another reason for not displaying it at the Auto Expo was that this is a facelift. There will be no change to its design or mechanicals. It will get some tweaks in styling and addition of a few features, to make it better value. The new Jazz will get upgrades and one of them is the headlamp. There will projector lamps and even daytime running LEDs also.

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There shall be some features on offer too, like sunroof, new touchscreen system and even HDMI input. The 1.2-litre petrol engine will continue on the Jazz and the other option is the 1.5-litre diesel. Petrol will be offered with a five-speed manual and CVT, while the diesel shall have 6-speed manual on offer. What all will the new Honda Jazz 2018 pack in? Read further to know more.The new-gen hatchback came in a year after it was launched in other markets, so the facelift will also be here for at least three years. The current Jazz was launched in mid 2015 and the facelift is expected to come after 3 years.Test drive for Honda Jazz .

Honda Jazz Design & Look

But more than anything else, you’ll like the Jazz’s design for more practical reasons. Such as how its tailgate extends low on the bumper or how its doors open nice and wide. And the first time you open those doors, the sheer space in the cabin will shock you. The Jazz is easily the most spacious car in its class with ample head, leg and shoulder room for five occupants. Passengers in the rear, however, will find the seat short on thigh support. The upward sloping floor (on account of the fuel tank being positioned under the front seats) may not be to everyone’s liking either.

What’s changed? We wouldn’t blame you if you thought Honda hasn’t bothered changing anything with respect to the design. That’s because, they haven’t — at all. The “updated” version of the Jazz has had no changes to the sheet metal, or the bumpers. International markets got a fresher looking model in 2017, replete with sportier looking bumpers, new alloy wheels, and a full-LED headlamp cluster (a la Honda City). Sadly, the Indian version gets the short end of the stick.

There’s nothing substantial to report here, save for the small dollop of chrome on the door handles, and the extended lighting in the tail lamps. The added lights, though, are available only in the top-spec VX variant. Since we’re talking of the VX variant, do note that the Jazz no longer gets the sweet-looking spoiler. Honda could have used this update to jazz it up a bit (pun intended), and throw in a pair of daytime running lamps if not the full-LED headlamps. But, that’s not been the case. What we do get, are two new colours borrowed from the Amaze – red and silver.

Honda Jazz Cabin & Comfort

Interestingly, this time around, only top-spec Jazz models will get the ‘magic seats’ at the back. These seats split, fold flat and flip upwards to make space for all shapes and sizes of cargo – that’s if the massive 354-litre boot won’t meet your needs anyway. These seats now also allow you to form a recliner by pushing the front seat backrests fully till they meet the rear seat base. It’s a unique feature picnickers and the chauffeur-driven will love. Those likely to spend more time in the back will also like how the backrest angle can be adjusted (a segment first) on top-end variants. However, the middle seat cushioning is firm and not very comfortable.

Up front, seat comfort is good but visibility past the thick A-pillars is limited and troublesome at crossroads. Otherwise, the Jazz’s driving environment is very similar to the City’s. The chunky steering, the instruments and the basic layout of the centre console are all very similar. The Jazz’s asymmetrical dashboard that comes finished in hard-wearing plastics extends further forwards towards the windscreen and the portion above the glovebox is more layered (there’s no secondary compartment like the old Jazz either). Still, with as many as nine cupholders and more than a few cubbyholes, you won’t find yourself short on storage spaces for small items.For Honda Jazz  check pasear-w.com 

Honda hopes you won’t find yourself shortchanged either. Because unlike the sparsely equipped old Jazz, the new one comes loaded with features. There’s a City-like dial-operated 5-inch colour screen for the rear-view camera and infotainment system with a larger 6.2-inch touchscreen offered on top variants. The touch-operated panel for the climate control system from the City also finds its way here and there are also steering-mounted buttons for audio and telephone functions.

Honda Jazz Engine & Transmission

A 1.2-litre petrol engine will continue to be the major seller for the Jazz. This mill churns about 88bhp of power and 115Nm of maximum torque. It is available with a five-speed manual transmission and a CVT as well. The engine is one of the most quietest ones around and whats so special is how it behaves. The engine doesn’t have the punch it more of a comfortable cruiser. One needs to downshift to overtake, especially on the highway.Then there is the 1.5-litre diesel engine. This one is powerful and it has more than sufficient torque. There is more than sufficient torque available across the bandwidth and driving this engine is ease. Overtaking is never a challenge with the Jazz diesel. Just that the engine is noisy, which effects the refinement of the cabin. This engine has a six-speed manual transmission.

Those looking for performance will be better off going for the 1.2 i-VTEC petrol engine with the manual gearbox – the sole engine-gearbox option the last Jazz could be had with. The engine produces 89bhp and 11.2kgm, both figures that are par for the course. Bottom-end responses aren’t the liveliest here but the engine does get into the flow of things by 2500rpm. Mid-range performance is good, but if you do choose to press on, you’ll love the steady and strong build of power all the way to the 6800rpm limiter. Stretching the engine also has it, quite literally, make all the right noises. The slick-shifting five-speed manual gearbox and well-weighted clutch only add to the fun.

But for those who’d like to do away with the bother of modulating the clutch altogether, Honda will also offer the petrol engine mated to a continuously variable transmission (CVT). We drove the petrol automatic Jazz and found it quite suited to average city driving. The gearbox responds well enough to mild changes in throttle and works to keep the engine running at its quietest and efficient best. But mash down on the throttle and the ‘rubber band effect’ CVT gearboxes are known for comes to the fore – the rise in revs isn’t matched by an equally swift rise in speed. The engine sounds strained at this point and more often than not, you’ll back off and let the engine get back to its comfort zone in the mid-range.

No major change here as well. The petrol engine returns about 12-13km/l in the city and about 15km/l on the highway. On the other hand, the petrol CVT should have an efficiency of about 11km/l in the city and 14km/l on the highway. The diesel should have a mileage of 18km/l in the city and close to 22km/l on the highway.

Honda Jazz Driving Dynamics

What’s impressive is that there are paddle shifters to let you take greater charge of things. There are seven ‘ratios’ you can shuffle between and the good thing is the system is quick to respond to tugs at the paddles. In manual mode, you can rev the engine to about 6000rpm before the electronics will upshift. Still, this engine-gearbox combo isn’t what you’d call sporty.

That’s something to say about the dynamics too. The steering offers good enough feel but handling on the whole is best described as safe and predictable. Typical buyers will like the Jazz more for how easy it is to twirl the steering and the fairly tight turning circle. Ride quality is also good for this class of car. The Jazz goes over bumps and potholes well but does get caught out by sharper edges every once in a while. There is a hint of firmness to the suspension but the positive is high speed stability is good.

Honda Jazz Safety & Security

Braking power on the hatchback is derived from front disc and rear drum brakes. As for safety, features such as dual front airbags, ABS with EBD, rear parking sensor, speed-sensing auto door lock and day/night inside rear view mirror are standard across line-up. In line with upcoming safety norms, the Jazz gets dual airbags, ABS and reverse parking sensors as standard. Other secondary safety features include a seatbelt reminder, front fog lamps, an immobilizer and a rear defogger.

Honda Jazz Price in Pune

Honda Jazz On-Road Price in Pune ranges from 6,80,246 to 10,78,088 for variants Jazz V MT Petrol and Jazz VX MT Diesel respectively. Honda Jazz is available in 7 variants and 6 colours. Below are details of Honda Jazz variants price in Pune. Check for Jazz price in Pune at Carzprice.

Honda Jazz Final Word

If space and versatility are paramount, there is quite simply no better option than the Jazz. Helping the Jazz’s case this time around is the fact that it can be had with a diesel engine and even in petrol automatic form meaning there’s a version of the car for every type of hatchback buyer. In every form, the Jazz comes across as a car that’s comfortable and well suited to the requirements of day-to-day city driving. It’s not exciting per se, but that’s unlikely to impact an average buyer’s decision. What will, is the price.

The good news is that, save for the top-spec VX versions available on the petrol manual and diesel cars, the rest of the Jazz range is competitively priced. So, in its latest form, the Jazz has the ingredients to become the hit it always deserved to be.

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