Affordable Benefits Of Virtual Business Phone Number

It can be dangerous to give out your phone number to people you don’t know, and that’s normally the case when a website asks you for your phone number. Fortunately, just like with anonymous email addresses and debit cards, you can also grab an anonymous, virtual phone number to mask your real number.When you use a virtual phone number, only that number is known, not your real number, even though the virtual number might ring your real phone to establish the phone call. Anyone you call, and anyone who calls your virtual number, cannot see your real phone number.. Check for Affordable Benefits Of Virtual Business Phone Number in Linkedphone

For any business, every customer call is important. Yet little attention is paid to maintaining a high quality incoming call management system resulting in considerable damage to brand reputation and incalculable business opportunity losses. Worse, the management has no control or information about:

No. of calls received

No. of calls missed

Who handled the call

What was spoken during the call

By greeting, routing and tracking all incoming calls received by the business, the Cloud Based Business Telephony Solution provides a simple, cost effective and yet highly efficient way of handling business inquiries.

CLOUD BASED BUSINESS HELPLINE SOLUTION FEATURES

Customers can choose a 10 digit mobile or toll-free number for the business Advertise the same in all business communications and stationary Employees can be grouped into departments and assigned extension numbers and calls routed to the department could be delivered to employees within that department automatically, wherever they may be, on their mobile phones. When lines are busy callers are automatically re-routed to other available numbers. Automatically managing incoming business calls,

Every caller is greeted professionally, tirelessly, 24×7 Not a single call is missed. All caller details are captured in real time 24×7 and business owners and managers can review the same in real time

Who should buy it

Designed to serve the requirements of those modern day technology enabled businesses,

Lot of incoming calls, everyday of the week A mobile workforce that needs to stay connect with the office at all times Where customers require extensive pre sale counseling or support by qualified employees Where customer regularly place repeat order on phone. These solutions are already deployed across many market verticals including Educational Institution, Online Matrimony, Retail, IT, Real Estate, FMCG sectors.

Advertising campaigns are becoming increasingly expensive and brand managers are asked to monitor campaign performance continually to derive highest value for money spent. In a multi-platform, multi-location campaign it is virtually impossible for brand managers to understand in real time:

Which campaign message or outlet is performing the best? What is the volume of inquires generated and which time of the day? Who handled the incoming inquiries and what transpired during this conversation? Till now real time campaign ROI measurement was partially possible only in an online campaign. By tracking all incoming calls generated by the campaign, cloud telephony based Campaign Response Management Solution provides a simple and yet highly effective real time solution to businesses.

These solutions will help you to manage your business, away from office also. It provides the most economic way to own a telephony solution for an entire company which earlier a big companies used to dream of.

If you think all the customers calls are important for your business or you are not able to identify where the incoming calls are coming from Cloud Telephony is the one stop solution for streamlining all the call management, tracking through Virtual IVRS and Virtual PBX.

 

 

Best Practices for Building Angular.js Apps

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Update 2016–04–17: I wrote this article almost 2 years ago for Angular 1.x. This article is still tremendously popular somehow, but I want to warn that it may not be the best for Angular 2.x or other methods of building JS front-ends. I have spent almost all my time writing CLI code since I wrote this, so I have really no context to say if this is still the best practice I considered it to be in 2014. Still, I offer a simple solution that many have said they prefer to more complicated setups.

Burke Holland had a fantastic post explaining how Angular loads an application and comparing the merits of browserify vs require.js in an Angular app.

I’ve worked with Angular on quite a few apps at this point, and have seen many different ways to structure them. I’m writing a book on architecting Angular apps right now with the MEAN stack and as such have researched heavily into this specific topic. I think I’ve set on a pretty specific structure I’m very happy with. It’s a simpler approach than what Burke Holland has proposed.

I must note that if I was on a project with his structure, I would be content. It’s good.

Before we start though, the concept of modules in the world of Angular can be a bit confusing, so let me lay out the current state of affairs.

What modules are in JavaScript JavaScript comes with no ability to load modules. A “module” means different things to different people. For this article, let’s use this definition:

Modules allow code to be compartmentalized to provide logical separation for the developers. In JavaScript, it also prevents the problem of conflicting globals. People new to JavaScript get a little confused about why we make such a big deal about modules. I want to make one thing clear: Modules are NOT for lazy-loading JavaScript components when needed. Require.js does have this functionality, but that is not the reason it is important. Modules are important due to the language not having support for it, and JavaScript desperately needing it.

A module can be different things. It could be Angular, lodash (you’re not still using underscore, are you?), shared code in your organization, some gist you found online, or separating features out inside your codebase.

JavaScript doesn’t support modules, so we’ve traditionally had a few various approaches. (Feel free to skip this next section if you understand JavaScript modules)

.noConflict() Let me illustrate the problem. Let’s say you want to include jQuery in your project. jQuery will define the global variable ‘$’. If, in your code, you have an existing variable ‘$’ those variables will conflict. For years, we got around this problem with a .noConflict() function. Basically .noConflict() allows you to change the variable name of the library you’re using.

If you had this problem, you would use it like this:

This has been a common practice in most JavaScript libraries, but it’s not a fantastic solution. It doesn’t provide very good compartmentalizing of code, it forces you to declare things before you use them, and it requires the imported code (either a library or your own code) to actually implement a .noConflict() function.

If that’s confusing, read up on it. It’s important to understand the problem before you continue onto the solutions below.

Nobody was happy with .noConflict(), so they started looking into other ways to solve the problem. We have 4 solutions worth mentioning in this context:

Require.js (Implementation of AMD) Browserify (Implementation of CommonJS) Angular dependency injection ES6 modules Each one has its pros and cons, and each works quite a bit differently. You can even use 1 or 2 in tandem (Burke used 2). I’ll cover what each does, how they work with Angular, and which one I suggest.

Sample App Let’s get a little Angular app together so we can talk about it.

Here is a simple app that lists users off Github. The code is here, but it’s the completed version we will build in this post. Read through for no spoilers!

All the JavaScript could be in this one file:

First we declare an ‘app’ object that is our module. We then define a service ‘GithubSvc’ with one function that can serve us users from Github.

After that, we define a controller that uses the service to load that array into $scope. (This is the HTML page that renders it)

Splitting into separate files The trouble is that this code is all in one file. Totally unreasonable for a real app. Maybe I’m a curmudgeon, but when I first started looking at Angular and the code samples all showed how to do this, all I wanted to see was a real world solution with proper separation.

I would like to have this code in a structure like this:

src/module.js src/github/github.svc.js src/github/github.ctrl.js Note: If this app got large, it might make sense to have a separate ‘github’ module as well.

The alternate way to do this would be to split things out by functionality rather than part of the codebase:

src/module.js src/services/github.svc.js src/controllers/github.ctrl.js I don’t have a strong preference either way. Probably very large apps would benefit from the former, and smaller ones the latter. For website design services visit Vivid Designs

Regardless, without using a module loader like browserify or require.js, we would have to add a script tag for every one of these files. That’s a no go. That could easily grow to hundreds of files.

There are performance reasons why you don’t want to have tons of script tags too. The browser does pipeline them, but it can only do so many at a time. They have overhead, and the latency would be killer to our friends outside of California.

So here is the goal:

We need a way to have many Angular files in dev, but they need to be loaded into the browser in bulk (not a script tag for each one).

This is why people look to module loaders like require.js or browserify. Angular allows you to logically separate out code, but not files. I’m going to show an easier way, but first let’s examine the available module loaders.

Require.js — Too complicated Require.js was the first major push towards coming up with a consistent way to have modules inside of JavaScript. Require.js allows you to define dependencies inside a JavaScript file that you depend on. It runs inside the browser and is capable of loading modules as needed.

It accomplishes 2 general tasks, loading of modules and handling the load order.

Unfortunately it’s really complicated to setup, requires your code to be written in a specific way, certainly has the steepest learning curve, and can’t deal with circular dependencies well — and that can happen when trying to use a module system on top of Angular.

Burke Holland covered the issues with using require.js with Angular very well, so I encourage you to read that for a clearer reason why you should not use Angular with require.js.

Working with RequireJS and AngularJS was a vacation on Shutter Island. On the surface everything looks very normal. Under that surface is Ben Kingsley and a series of horrific flashbacks. — Burke Holland The ability for require.js to load modules on demand is also something that won’t work with Angular (at least, in a reasonable situation). That seems to be something people want, but I’ve certainly never worked on a project that needed it.

I want to emphasize that last point as people get this wrong: Module systems are not so that you only load the code you need. Yes require.js does do that, but it’s not why require.js is useful. Modules are useful to logically separate code for developers to reason about it easier.

In any case, it’s a bad solution and I won’t show you how to do it. I bring it up because people often ask me how to integrate require.js with Angular.

Browserify — A much better module loader Where require.js has the browser load the modules, browserify runs on the server before it runs in the browser. You can’t take a browserify file and run it in a browser, you have to ‘bundle’ it first.

It uses a similar format (and is almost 100% compatible with) the Node.js module loading. It looks like this:

It’s a really pretty, easy to read format. You simply declare a variable and ‘require()’ your module into it. Writing code that exports a module is very easy too.

In Node, it’s great. The reason it can’t work in the browser, however, is that it’s synchronous. The browser would have to wait when hitting one of those require sections, then make an http call to load the code in. Synchronous http in a browser is an absolute no-no.

It works in Node since the files are on the local filesystem, so the time it takes to do one of those ‘requires()’ is very fast.

So with browserify, you can take code like this and run it with browserify and it will combine all the files together in a bundle that the browser can use. Once again, Burke’s article covers using browserify with Angular very well.

By the way, if everything I just said about browserify is confusing, don’t worry about it. It’s certainly more confusing than the solution I’m about to propose.

It is a great tool I would jump to use on a non-Angular project. With Angular, however, we can do something simpler.

Angular Dependency Injection — Solves most of our problems Go back and look at our sample app’s app.js. I want to point out a couple of things:

It doesn’t matter what order we create the service or the controller. Angular handles that for us with its built-in Dependency Injection. It also allows us to do things like mocking out the service in a unit test. It’s great, and my number one favorite feature inside Angular.

Having said that, with this method, we do need to declare the module first to use that ‘app’ object. It’s the only place that order of declarations matter in Angular, but it’s important.

What I want to do, is simply concatenate all the files together into one, then require just that JavaScript file in our HTML. Because the app object has to be declared first, we just need to make sure that it’s declared before anything else.

Gulp Concat To do this, I will be using Gulp. Don’t worry about learning a newfangled tool though, I’m going to use it in a very simple way and you can easily port this over to Grunt, Make, or whatever build tool you want (shockingly, even asset pipeline). You just need something that can concat files.

I’ve played around with all the popular build systems and Gulp is far and away my favorite. When it comes to building css and javascript, specifically, it’s bliss.

You might be thinking I’m just replacing one build tool (browserify) with another (gulp), and you would be correct. Gulp, however, is much more general purpose. You can compose this Gulp config with other tools like minification, CoffeeScript precompilation (if you’re into that sort of thing), sourcemaps, rev hash appending, etc. Yes it’s nothing browserify can’t do, but once you learn how to do it with Gulp you can do the same on any other asset (like css). Ultimately it’s much less to learn.

You can use it to process png’s, compile your sass, start a dev node server, or running any code you can write in node. It’s easy to learn, and will provide a consistent interface to your other developers. It provides us a platform to extend on later.

I would much rather just type ‘gulp watch’ and have that properly watch all my static assets in dev mode than have to run ‘watchify’, a separate node server, a separate sass watcher, and whatever else you need to keep your static files up to date.

First I’ll install Gulp and gulp-concat (gotta be in the project and global):

$ npm install –global gulp $ npm install –save-dev gulp gulp-concat By the way, you’ll need a package.json in your app and have Node installed. Here’s a little trick I do to start my Node apps (npm init is too whiny):

$ echo ‘{}’ > package.json Then toss in this gulpfile.js:

This is a simple task that takes in the JavaScript files in src/ and concatenates them into app.js. Because it expects this array, any file named module.js will be included first. Don’t worry too much about understanding this code, when we get to minification I’ll clear it up.

If you want to play along at home, use these files, then run ‘gulp js’ to build the assets. Donezo.

For more on Gulp, read my article on setting up a full project with it.

Icky Globals We can do better. You know how you create that ‘app’ variable? That’s a global. Probably not a problem to have one ‘app’ global, but it might be a problem when we grow to have more and more modules, they may conflict.  Web development company in New Delhi

Luckily Angular can solve this for us very easily. The function angular.module() is both a getter and a setter. If you call it with 2 arguments:

That’s a setter. You just created a module ‘app’ that has ‘ngRoute’ as a dependency. (I won’t be using ngRoute here, but I wanted to show what it looks like with a dependent module)

Calling that setter will also return the module as an object (that’s what we put into var app). Unfortunately you can only call it once. Disappointingly, getting this stuff wrong throws nasty error messages that can be frustrating to newbies. Stick to the xxx method and all will be good though.

If we call angular.module() with a single argument:

It’s a getter and also returns the module as an object, but we can call it as many times as we want. For this reason, we can rewrite our components from this:

The difference is subtle and might seem innocuous to new JavaScript developers. The advanced ones are nodding along now though. To maintain a large JavaScript codebase is to prevent the usage of globals.

To you pedants: I realize that there is still a global ‘angular’ object, but there’s almost certainly no point in avoiding that.

Here we have a pretty well functioning way to build the assets, but there are a few more steps we need to get to the point of a fine-tuned build environment. Namely, it’s a pain to have to run ‘gulp js’ every time we want to rebuild ‘app.js’.

Gulp Watch This is really easy, and I think the code speaks for itself (Lines 10-12):

This just defines a ‘gulp watch’ task we can call that will fire off the ‘js’ task every time a file matching ‘src/**/*.js’ changes. Blammo.

Minification Alright, let’s talk minification. In Gulp we create streams from files (gulp.src), then pipe them through various tools (minification, concatenation, etc), and finally output them to a gulp.dest pipe. If you know unix pipes, this is the same philosophy.

In other words, we just need to add minification as a pipe. First, install gulp-uglify to minify:

$ npm install -D gulp-uglify

But we have a problem! It has munged the function argument names Angular needs to do dependency injection! Now our app doesn’t work. If you’re not familiar with this problem, read up.

We can either use the ugly array syntax in your code, or we can introduce ng-gulp-annotate.

NPM install:

$ npm install -D gulp-ng-annotate And here’s the new gulpfile:

I hope you’re starting to see the value in Gulp here. How I can use a conventional format of Gulp plugins to quickly solve each of these build problems I am running into.

Sourcemaps Everyone loves their debugger. The issue with what we’ve built so far is that it’s now this minified hunk of JavaScript. If you want to console.log in chrome, or run a debugger, it won’t be able to show you relevant info.

Here’s a Gulp task that will do just that! (Install gulp-sourcemaps)

Why Concat is Better Concat works better here because it’s simpler. Angular is handling all of the code loading for us, we just need to assist it with the files. So long as we get that module setter before the getters, we have nothing to worry about.

It’s also great because any new files we just add into the directory. No manifest like we would need in browserify. No dependencies like we would need in require.js.

It’s also just generally one less moving part, one less thing to learn.

What we built Here is the final code. It’s an awesome starting point to build out your Angular app.

It’s got structure. It’s got a dev server. It’s got minification. It’s got source maps. It’s got style. (The Vincent Chase kind, not the CSS kind) It doesn’t have globals. It doesn’t have shitloads of <script> tags. It doesn’t have a complex build setup. I tried to make this not about Gulp, but as you can tell: I freaking love the thing. As I mentioned earlier, you could achieve a similar setup with anything that can concat.

If there is interest, I could easily extend this to add testing/css/templates/etc. I already have the code. EDIT: https://github.com/dickeyxxx/angular-boilerplate

Third-party code For third-party code: if it’s something available on a CDN (Google CDN, cdnjs, jsdelivr, etc), use that. If the user has already loaded it from another site, the browser will reuse it. They also have very long cache times.

If it’s something not available on a CDN, I would still probably use a new script tag but load it off the same server as the app code. Bower is good for keeping these sorts of things in check.

If you have a lot of third-party code, you should look into minifying and concatenating them like above, but I would keep it separate from your app code so you don’t have just one huge file.

ES6 Modules — The real solution The next version of JavaScript will solve this problem with built-in modules. They worked hard to ensure that it works well for both fans of CommonJS (browserify) and AMD (require.js). This version is a ways out, and you probably won’t be able to depend on the functionality without a shim of some kind for at least a year, probably a few. When it does come out, however, this post will be a relic explaining things you won’t need to worry about (or at least it’ll be horrifically incorrect).

Angular 2.0 It’s worth mentioning that Angular 2.0 will use ES6 modules, and at that point we’ll be in bliss. It’s nowhere close to release though, so for now, if you want to use Angular, you need a different option. Angular 2.0 will be a dream. It’s going to look a lot more like a series of useful packages than a framework, allowing you to pick and choose functionality, or bake them into an existing framework (like Ember or Backbone).

Angular 2.0 will use a separate library di.js that will handle all of this. It’s way simpler, and it’s only a light layer on top of ES6 modules. We should be able to easily use it in all apps, not just Angular apps. The unfortunate thing for you is that you will need to deal with the crufty state of affairs with JavaScript modules until then.

Man. I love all these great ways JavaScript is improving, but god damn is it a lot to keep learning.

If you’d like to learn more about Angular, check out my book on creating apps with the MEAN stack.

Source

A Beginner’s Portfolio

Clark Nelson

One of the first things everyone does when they are trying to enter the industry is to create a portfolio or personal site. This is an obvious choice because you don’t have any assigned work and are allowed unlimited creative freedom to create whatever you like. Actually, portfolios are quite challenging as a designer’s first website but i’m here to help you. If you are looking for website design for your company check Vivid Designs 

As someone new to the industry, an aspiring designer probably has little to fill their portfolio with. Content is the backbone of any site, and you want to avoid releasing a website with nothing worth saying. Adapting a policy of minimalism is always a wise idea when working with very little, but this style is sometimes challenging for new designers to understand and master.

A website should be created with a specific purpose in mind, and must be designed to accomplish that goal. When building your first website it’s easy to let it get out of control by adding features and sections that don’t make sense. It is tempting to create something that expresses your taste in things such as music, games, or other recreational activities. Your personality should show through the design of the site, employeers don’t need to know every detail. Web development company in Hyderabad

A portfolio must work to convey the personality of the designer that created it. Your biggest tools in this department are color and typography, use them wisely to give off the impression you want to make. If you lack enough work to define your personality, consider adding some flair but going overboard can subtract from your professionalism. You are trying to create a foundation with which you will add to in the future, as you start to gain work experience.

Your first portfolio is a learning experience. No one expects it to be perfect. This is a great opportunity to experiment with current trends and new technologies. There are plenty of places to find out what the best designers have been putting into their sites. https://dribbble.com/search?q=portfolio

Don’t be afraid to get your hands dirty and then start over again. Learn about prototyping and use it to experiment and find a layout that works for you.

Follow conventions. Many new designers and developers try interface ideas that they’ve had in the past and find out that they don’t work to well in practice. Let someone use your website and see if they can figure out where to click and scroll, you will be supprised.

I wish you the best of luck designing your new website! If you need any help or have a question let me know 🙂 https://clarknelson.com

The Virtual Phone System Is a Perfect Phone Solution for Your Business

With a Virtual PBX Phone System you can avail the functionality of a traditional PBX without the need for buying /installing any equipment. Instead the PBX system will be maintained at the service provider’s site. You can add new features and expand the system with ease.An efficient PBX system is a compelling necessity for a company’s business communication more so for incipient businesses. Any ineffective communication system can cripple an incipient business and retard its growth.A Virtual or Hosted PBX system operates through a service provider. A Virtual PBX service provider caters to a number of companies and hence utilizes multiple PBX systems with redundant components. They have the technical personnel to provide you uninterrupted 24×7 services.

With competition getting fiercer in almost all business sectors, it is critically important for a business enterprise to have an efficient communication system for it to stay and survive and grow. After studying various phone systems available in the market, it can be said without fear of contradiction that a hosted PBX virtual phone service is the best option for small and midsize business houses to optimally meet their communication needs.The hosted virtual PBX solution offers you numerous useful features compared to the old hardware based systems and more than that, it enables you to save a lot of money. Yet another huger benefit of virtual PBX system is that you need not invest in costly equipment and the maintenance and support is the responsibility of the service provider.

An incipient company can save upfront investment as no purchase of equipment is needed. They also need not the bother about maintenance of hardware. Assured of a reliable PBX service, an incipient company can focus on their core business activities.The scalability of a hosted PBX phone system is a major plus for an incipient company. You can expand the system as your business grows and this means that at any given point in time – you will be paying only for what you use. This can result in huge cost savings as there is no overbuying.By equipping your incipient business with a feature-rich PBX phone system, your customer calls can be handled in a professional manner. This type of PBX will also enhance your company image. This phone system will also improve your employees’ work output and productivity.

To help incipient businesses communicate effectively with their customers, PBX phone systems provide sophisticated features that are found in costly telephone systems used by big corporations. These include auto-attendant, automatic call distribution, call forwarding, voice to email, call conferencing, call waiting, fax to email, music on hold, caller ID and lot more.Incoming calls are attended by the virtual receptionist with recorded business greetings. Callers are presented with options like dial-by-name, dial-by-extension etc. The virtual PBX system adroitly manages several simultaneous incoming calls and performs call routing without sending out connection busy signals. In short, there is no need for you to employ a special receptionist/telephone operator as all these functions are fully automated.

Using the find-me/follow-me call forwarding option, calls to main business numbers can be answered on your cell phone or other landlines assigned as extensions. This feature enables your employees to work from anywhere. Calls that are not answered are instantly transferred to the voicemail system, enabling callers to place voice messages. This feature not only improves the overall communication efficiency but also ensures no incoming customer calls are missed.As stated earlier, to avail in full the capabilities of PBX phone systems Psychology Articles, it is not necessary to set up any expensive premise-based hardware. The service providers maintain the equipment at their site and PBX functionalities are offered through broadband Internet or telephone networks at reasonable monthly rent. The virtual PBX is totally versatile and the features and functionalities can be tailored according to the distinct requirements of a subscriber.

 

Audi A6 Features & Design

OVERVIEW ;

Audi recently introduced a special edition of its Audi A6 sedan to celebrate the sale of 6000 Audi A6 cars over a span of six years in India. The special edition Audi A6 executive class sedan is available in two engine options – 2.0 TDI and 3.0 TDI – at an introductory price of Rs 46.33 lakh onwards (ex-showroom Delhi). Audi has dropped the petrol variant from the A6 range but has announced that they will soon be launching the S6 which will sport the petrol engine. Keeping in line with Audi’s top down strategy, some key features from Audi’s flagship car – the A8 – are now available in the Audi A6. The special edition Audi A6 now comes equipped with Adaptive Air Suspension with Audi Drive Select, 4-Zone Air Conditioning, Rear Side Airbags, Bose Surround Sound System, MMI Touch, Comfort Key, MMI Remote Control, Front Co-Driver seat adjustment from the rear and LED headlights as standard.

DESIGN AND STYLE ;

The first impression of a car is the way it appears on the outside and for A6 it is definitely a charmer. It is not one of those delicate saloons that look flashy from exteriors; in fact the aggressive styling made to the exteriors further accentuates the robust essence of the sedan. The first look at the sedan will make you hopelessly in love with it, all thanks to the bold front facet.

The hood is wide and the two vertical hood lines flowing from the edge of windscreen to the radiator grille typifies the sporty character of the saloon. Use of chrome is done generously; the large pentagon shaped radiator grille featuring multiple chrome bars and the iconic four rings appears bullish. The chrome surround on the radiator grille renders it a neat finish. The agile Matrix LED head lights in front are inspired from the Audi A8. There are short creases on either end in-between the space between head lights and lower bumper.

Drop to the lower end of the bumper and you will notice fog lights, air intakes and a hint of chrome that looks sporty. Side skirts too have been modified, it gets sportier. View from side is relatively sober as compared to front. The chrome finished outside door handles are way too plush, while the outside rear view mirror has to settle with the body matching colour. It gets power folding and adjustable functions along with integrated turn indicators. The large wheels ornate by multiple spoke alloy rims perfectly balance with the metal mass above it. A thin chrome lining carefully outlining the window frame adds charm to the side profile. Moreover, the sharp beltline running from C pillar right to the edge of the hood spells command. Hop to the rear to notice new tail lamps, exhaust pipes, tweaked bumper and a chrome strip placed on the lower edge of the boot lid. A slide and tilt all glass sunroof lends exquisiteness to the saloon.

CABIN AND COMFORT ;

The 2017 Audi A6 has one of the best cabins in its class, with an attractive dash layout, excellent materials quality and solid fit and finish. The infotainment system controls a dizzying array of functions, utilizing a dash-mounted pop-up screen and a knob and buttons on the center console. The system boasts logical menus and crisp graphics, and the “MMI navigation plus” upgrade (standard on all except the base 2.0T Premium) includes USB integration and a touchpad that can recognize fingertip scrawls. It’s sophisticated, but we still prefer BMW’s iDrive or Mercedes’ COMAND for overall ease of use.

The upgraded MMI system can also serve as a 4G LTE mobile Wi-Fi hotspot for up to eight devices, and adds Google Earth data to the navigation system while providing a simplified Google search for POIs. The Google Earth feature is essentially form over function, however, as it can make the map more difficult to comprehend at a glance.

The A6’s front seats are supportive and comfortable, remaining so even on long trips. The spacious backseat offers more real-world legroom than most rivals. The A6’s 14.1-cubic-foot trunk is slightly below average for the segment, but we’ve found it generous in real-world testing, and the rear seatbacks fold and offer a pass-through when more space is needed.

ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION ;

The Audi A6 is available in an In-line 4 cylinder 2.0TDI engine and a V6 configured 3.0TDI engine. The 2.0 TDI engine has a front wheel drive while the V6 has the Quattro drive as standard. Even the transmission pack can be opted between the Multitronic and the S-tronic for different drive train.Even though this one is a luxury sedan which is primarily intended to spoil customers, the A6 succeeded in impressing us with its handling and suspensions quality. The power steering which features a new electromechanical drive makes it more convenient than the earlier models. The 2.0 TDI is not a performer at all but then when you strap yourself in the V6 motor, it is mayhem as it’s a lethal combination of massive size versus massive performance.

It features air suspension with controlled damping. This damping makes sure that the vehicle is very quick in adapting the suspension setup according to the terrain. It nullifies all the redundant forces acting on the vehicle.In the 2.0TDI, the engine gets enthusiastic only in mid range as initially the lag in the engine is strong. It takes time for the 4 cylinder unit to produce enough power to propel this business liner. The engine is very balanced and gets juicy at the mid level only. Post that it takes its own linear time to grow in the power curve. The 3.0 TDI is a very sporty motor and has a split character compared to the smaller unit. It flexes its muscle very quickly. Even though we had a brief encounter with the 3.0 V6, it indeed brought an evil smirk on our face.

RIDE AND HANDLING ;

As with most modern Audis, the A6 is a very easy car to drive. Yes, the steering does feel very light at high speeds but since these cars will be mainly used to doddle around town in, a lighter steering is indeed a boon. That said, it could certainly do with a bit more weight after a certain speed. The A6 is also a surprisingly easy car to look out of both in normal driving conditions and while parking. Of course, the rear parking camera and parking sensors are still pretty necessary in a car this big.

Thankfully, the Audi A6 rides quite well too. On most uneven roads, the A6 does tend to absorb bumps and uneven surfaces really well to a certain limit when it then tends to feel uncomfortable. The Audi A6 isnt a corner carving handling machine either. In fact, this large sedan does tend to feel a little leary around the bends and when combined with the light steering does feel a little floaty too. That said, we are grateful for the fact that the A6 comes with the more durable 245/45 R18 Bridgestone Turanza tyres as compared to the gripper but delicate Pirelli ones that you get on the A3.

SAFETY ;

The latest safety features of Audi A6 sedan ensure all-round protection for the passengers during critical situations, like fast braking and accidents. In order to shield the passengers from the impact of collisions, in the event of accidents, the dual-stage airbags deploy automatically. The standard safety features of the automobile include anti-theft alarm, Anti-lock Braking System (ABS), Electronic Stability Program (ESP) and “Servotronic”, for precise control at high speeds and effortless parking.

BOTTOMLINE ;

The new Audi A6 does all that a prospective buyer in this segment would look for and it simply excels in quite a few areas. The vehicle is very practical, offering tons of luxury with everyday usability. Not only does the A6 ride splendidly well, it also offers reasonably good handling and remains extremely surefooted at high speeds. Factor in the splendid performance from the V6 diesel engine and well crafted interiors and the new A6 immediately becomes the top pick in its segment.

 

Jaguar XE Facelift Test Drive

OVERVIEW ;

Jaguar XE is a premium compact sports sedan from the stable of Jaguar that comes with an elegant but powerful look. It has a sturdy build and is equally at ease in city roads as well as in uneven off track drive. The Jaguar XE images that the company released during Auto Expo 2016 shows an amazing designed car with commanding presence and style. It falls in the above 4-meter category and has remarkable features that give it an edge over its rivals in the market that are within this price bracket. Jaguar XE is available in two different trims; one of them is called the Jaguar XE and the other is called Jaguar XE 2.0L Petrol Pure2.0L Petrol Portfolio. This well-built sedan has a big 2835mm of wheelbase that allows it to seat around 4 passengers comfortably. The design of this SUV looks masculine and the comfort level of this car is on par with other such vehicles in this price category. Check Price of XE

STYLE AND DESIGN ;

The Jaguar XE, in the released publicity material and spy shots, looks exactly like the larger XF and the flagship XJ. This is a common practice among all the manufacturers partly due to economies of scale and partly due to the fact that it is easy for them to adapt a successful design across all their models to retain familiarity of product.

The Jaguar XE will get a smaller version of the XF’s massive chrome mesh grille complete with the leaping cat. Standard features are expected to be projector headlights, LED daytime lights and projector fog lamps. We even expect that the bumper will remain the same but with a higher ground clearance. Apply car loan for XE at Carzprice

The side profile is also similar to that of the XF in terms of roof line, flared wheels arches and the rake angle of the roof line both in the front and back. However, while the boot will have similar design elements as the XF and XJ-like tail lamp cluster and chrome strips, it appears to be far smaller (in relation to the larger cars). The rear bumper is expected to be a little sportier and will be complemented by dual exhausts.

COMFORT AND CABIN ;

The 2017 Jaguar XE’s cabin features an attractive, uncluttered dashboard with clean lines, but it lacks the sort of visual flair that made the original Jag XF and current XJ so special. Its quality also leaves a lot to be desired. Compared to what’s in its German luxury sedan competitors, the door trim looks and feels a bit flimsy, the trim that wraps around the dash is unremarkable, and the dash top itself is shiny and a bit coarse. Our test car also had more squeaks and rattles than usual, and in general, the XE’s cabin feels as if it belongs to a nice midsize family sedan rather than an entry-level luxury one.

Admittedly, opting for a non-black color scheme improves things as does opting for the range-topping R-Sport model that covers the dash in stitched simulated leather. It makes a difference. So too does the 10.2-inch InControl Pro touchscreen included in the Technology Pack. It has impressively quick processing speed, responds well to inputs, and its especially wide size makes it look modern and aids functionality. Some of its audio controls are a little tricky to figure out, but in general, the system works well. The same could be said of the base InControl touchscreen, but it’s smaller, slower to respond and has less advanced graphics.

In keeping with the segment’s sporty character, the 2017 XE feels snug and intimate from the driver seat. Controls fall readily at hand and the supportive driver seat should adjust enough to accommodate taller drivers. Unfortunately, such ample adjustment up front does take its toll on the backseat. The XE’s Audi, BMW and Mercedes competitors all have more spacious rear accommodations. And although the 15.9-cubic-foot trunk would seem to be among the segment-best on paper, in practice it’s a bit narrow and those of competitors are likely more useful.

ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION ;

The punchy nature of the engine is more in keeping with the XE’s sporty pretensions. The engine feels quicker than its 9-second 0-100kph time would suggest and kickdown acceleration is good too, though its rivals are faster still. The engine bunches up its power for release at 2000rpm and till 4000rpm, progress is strong. You can rev on and even hold gear at the 4900rpm limiter in manual mode but the eight-speed gearbox does such a nice job of things on its own, you’ll be happy to let it do its thing. In Dynamic drive mode, the gearbox gets the best out of the engine by selecting the ratio that keeps revs near the 2000rpm mark. Resultantly, there’s no delay in the build of power and the XE just lunges forward as and when you need it to. The XE also adapts well to a relaxed driving style. The gearbox keeps engine revs and noise levels low. It’s just that the engine isn’t as quiet as it ought to be. Throttle inputs are usually accompanied by a grumble from the engine and there’s a drone in the mid-range too. You just won’t get the same sense of calm in the cabin as you would in the beautifully insulated A4 35TDI, though a BMW 320d is noisier still.

It’s actually the 320d that the XE 20d can be best clubbed together. Both cars are designed to put the driver at the heart of the action. And like its petrol siblings, the XE diesel succeeds in this quest, and how. The steering is straight up incredible and there is a very natural balance in the chassis that makes the XE a joy to drive on curvy roads. Yup, we can’t wait to bring it head-to-head with a Bimmer either. Ride quality, again like the petrols, is really good too. There is a great balance between body movement arresting firmness and ride-enhancing suppleness in the suspension setup, and only on occasion will the XE thud and thump on our roads.

RIDE AND HANDLING ;

The ride of the XE is smooth. It has been tuned for better handling, but for India it has tweaked for better ride also. Drive on broken tarmac or even at high speeds. It irons out most of the road shocks for front and rear passengers making it extremely comfortable for the occupants. The handling of the XE is just fantastic. What makes it even better is the steering feedback. The steering wheel weighs up as speed increases. Most of the sedans in this segment now have electronic steering wheel that is extremely light and kills the joy for those who enjoy driving

SAFETY ;

The Jaguar XE got the highest safety rating, 5 star in the Euro NCAP test. It comes with the usual package of safety features which are more or less standard across the segment. The lightweight aluminium structure of the car is supported by high strength steel in impact areas which gives solidity to the car. The sales and service network of Jaguar is limited when compared to the German trio but they are expanding steadily. Yes, the current Jaguar owners haven’t been happy with the service quality but the Tata owned brand is committed towards customer satisfaction.

BOTTOMLINE ;

The all-new Jaguar XE is worth a look in the luxury small car class, but some rivals may better fit your needs, so be sure to cross-shop before you buy. The XE’s strong suit is its sharp performance, though you can get a similar driving experience behind the wheel of the BMW 3 Series. Inside, the XE has nice features, but it isn’t especially roomy, and there are some unappealing materials that don’t fit the luxury brand. The Audi A4’s cabin, on the other hand, feels premium and has generous space for all passengers.

Ford Figo Hatchback Overview

OVERVIEW ;

Hatchbacks are the most popular segment in India and for a long time, only a couple of brands were readily accepted in this high volume space. With the launch of the Figo, Ford’s India game plan took a drastic change for the better and the car brought the American automaker new customers, those who had never ever thought of owing a Ford before. The success of the first gen model is now set to go to newer heights with the launch of the all new Figo, a car that looks hugely promising on paper that we drove it all the way to one of the seven wonders of the world to see what it offers in the real world. Check On Road Price of Figo in Carzprice

EXTERIOR AND LOOKS ;

Talk about styling and this new generation Figo surely won’t disappoint. Ford has already launched the Figo Aspire which is actually the same Figo hatch with an additional boot, so all of you actually have a very distinctive idea about the new Figo hatch styling. Towards the front the new generation Figo, gets the same trapezoidal grille which looks quite aggressive while the dynamic and sleek styling is what sets it apart from the rest of its competition. Apart from the bold looking trapezoidal grille the hatchback also gets elongated headlamps up front as well. The side profile of the vehicle looks identical to the compact sedan. The top end Titanium+ also gets an impressive alloy wheels as well. While towards the rear the well proportioned tailgate with stylish set of taillamps enhances the overall appeal. What else helps in enhancing the overall appeal is the accentuated character line which runs through the lamp clusters and also gives us an idea of the overall width of this hatch. The bold shoulder line merges perfectly with the taillamps as well which helps in adding the sense of movement even when the hatch is not in motion.Trade in Your used car for Figo

INTERIOR AND SPACE ;

Just like the exteriors, the Figo and its Aspire sibling are near-identical on the inside as well. The only difference here is that the Figo cabin is finished in all-black plastics where the Aspire’s follows a richer dual-tone theme. Either way, you won’t mistake the cabin for anything but that belonging to a Ford’s, largely thanks to the familiar-looking dashboard. The basic-looking instrument cluster, busy centre console and elegant knurled dials for the climate control system are other things you are bound to notice. Top Titanium + cars get a digital (albeit old-school) readout atop the dash for Ford’s Sync infotainment system. Lower trim cars lose the screen, but instead feature Ford’s clever MyDock phone holder. It’s designed to hold phones of all sizes snugly and is a useful feature for those who frequently use their phone’s GPS systems for directions.

Visibility out the front is decent, but it would have helped to have reach adjust for the steering; the stretched-out driving position may not be to everyone’s liking. There’s enough space though, and the seats themselves are comfortable, if a bit soft. At the rear, there’s enough room for your legs and knees even with a tall front occupant; scooping out the front seatbacks has helped free up crucial space here. Aiding the feel of space are the large rear ◊ ∆ windows that give a good view out. As for comfort, the rear seatback is nicely reclined, but seat cushioning is a bit too soft and there are no adjustable headrests either.

Quality and fit-finish in the cabin are acceptable, but no more. You can tell Ford has cut costs and there’s a noticeable inconsistency between the textures on the plastics used in the cabin. The switchgear, though, works with a tactile and positive feel. What also works well are the small touches in terms of storage space and practicality. There’s the nook ahead of the gearlever (to stow away odds and ends) and the concealed pockets between the side of the dash and doors (useful for keeping your valuables in). Each front door can hold two bottles and the glovebox is decent-sized as well. Rear occupants won’t be as happy with storage spaces as there’s just a sole bottleholder for their use. On the positive side, the tail opens to reveal a sizeable 257-litre luggage bay. The rear seat back also folds forward, should you need more space. Unfortunately, the loading lip is a bit high and the boot floor is low, so you’ll have to lift heavy luggage more than you’d like.

ENGINE AND PERFORMANCE ;

Like its sedan sibling, the Ford Figo 2017 also comes with three engine options. A 1.2-litre petrol with 87bhp of power and 112Nm torque, mated to a five-speed manual transmission. The second engine is a 1.5-litre petrol that comes only with a six-speed DCT (dual clutch transmission). A dual cluch mechanism is a advanced automatic transmission and Ford was the first in India to introduce this technology in its segments, with the Fiesta. And lastly, the third engine is a 1.5-litre diesel that produces 98bhp of power and 215Nm of torque. This engine offers good performance and while there is a little turbo lag, it manages well with a strong mid-range. Its fits in well for a city as well as highway drive.

The diesel engine in the Ford Figo 2017 offers optimum performance with good fuel efficiency and is very usable too. The diesel is certainly the more powerful option and the good bit is there isn’t much lag that we generally notice in diesel engines, this makes it easy to drive in the city or even on the highway. Ford Figo 2017 is the most powerful diesel hatchback in its segment and there is sufficient power to drive it in the city or even the highways. Push the throttle and you can overtake with ease. It didn’t have that sudden rush of power when the turbo kicks in, it is more of linear increase improving the drivability.

RIDE AND HANDLING ;

An all-new B562 platform forms the underpinnings of the Figo and Figo Aspire. Ford have increased the ground clearance of this car from the outgoing version to now 174mm. The car rides well over biggerbumps, however, the smallerones do unsettle the vehicle a bit. The handling is typical Ford. Precise. The steering is light but weighs up decently at high speeds. The car holds its line well during hard cornering while the brakes themselves are sharp and shed speed rapidly without much fade. Stability on the Yamuna expressway where I drove the car was also impressive

BRAKING AND SAFETY ;

The Ford Figo has front disc brakes, while the rear are drums. The Figo’s ability to brake is good and this even has anti-lock braking system with EBD and ESP. This helps to enhance the braking capability and at the same time it is helpful to retain control of the vehicle.The new Figo is one of the most safest hatchbacks in its segment. Airbag is a standard feature across all variants and the Titanium Plus getting six airbags. There is ABS with EBD. ESP, reverse parking sensors, fog lamps, settles for all passengers

BOTTOMLINE ;

Compared to the first generation model, the Figo embodies plethora changes and good news is that these changes have bettered the hatchback. Exterior styling is in line with Aspire, similarities don’t end here even the interiors and engine choices are similar. The automatic option comes with a number of additional features missing in the rest of the line-up. Performance is not as good as one would expect but the other pros in the hatchback are good enough to make do with this void. Interiors are not just stylish but comfortable too in terms of space. With dual front airbags as standard and total six airbags employed for occupants’ safety, Figo has a cusp over rivals. Pricing is affordable which should also work in the vehicle’s favor.

 

Volkswagen Ameo Overview,Features & Performance

OVERVIEW ;

Volkswagen has been present in India since a few years now but it was just this year that they launched a made for India product with the Ameo. Within no time, the Ameo became Volkswagen’s best selling car in India, with its sales being more than all other VW cars combined. This was only with a petrol version on sale and now the Ameo’s popularity is set to increase further as the diesel model has been launched, available with both manual and DSG automatic transmission. We drive the car from Mumbai to Nashik and back to analyse how the updated diesel motor fares in the compact German sedan.

The Ameo is the first Volkswagen car tailor made for India and it competes in a segment where there is a lot of demand, hence pricing and value proposition remain important.

DESIGN AND STYLING ;

From the front the Volkswagen Ameo looks identical to the Polo. The bumper’s length has been reduced by 35mm to make space for the boot. Upto the C-pillar things remain the same. Then comes a new boot. From the rear, the Ameo looks more like the Skoda Rapid. The German automaker is looking at enhancing its reach with this new compact sedan. The wheelbase is the same as the Polo and there is no other difference, expect for a new boot and different colour options.

CABIN ;

The superbly appointed interior is back too, with VW’s typically restrained-looking dashboard and exceptional fit and finish. The long equipment list on this Highline trim returns, replete with a touchscreen, rear-view camera, automatic wipers, cornering lamps, cruise control, two airbags and ABS. In fact, those last two safety features are standard across the range. The DSG auto version additionally gets ESC and a hill hold function. Finally, the rear seat – it isn’t the most spacious, especially on knee room, but if your use is only occasional, it might be good enough.

ENGINE AND PERFORMANCE ;

The new Ameo TDI is offered with the same 1.5-litre turbocharged diesel engine as is the Polo and Vento. Only difference is in the larger turbocharger which has enabled the engine to deliver a tuned-up 81kW or about 110PS of peak power and a peak torque of 250Nm – that is quite impressive for a small car that weighs just over 1,150kgs. With the idling engine rpm level being about 800rpm and the redline starting at about 5,200rpm, the delivery of power and torque is perfectly tuned within the mid-range for power, and low-rpm range for torque. Peak torque kicks in as early as 1,500rpm and turbo-lag is quite minimal. The result is an eager performer for a car in the CS segment. The Ameo’s gear ratios have been spaced just right and from when you slip into first gear, there is enough room to work the gearbox through either a passive city driving cycle or an aggressive mix of cruising and over-taking on the highway.

While idling and when you are outside the Ameo, this four-cylinder still has the trademark diesel clatter, but step into the cabin and the good insulation package manages to cut out a lot of the noise. You can still hear the engine at cold start and at high revs. The manual gearbox is a clean shifting 5-speeder and can easily be your choice especially with so much low-end torque available to exploit. The 7-speed, dual clutch DSG automatic is another USP altogether in the Ameo. With so many buyers now preferring automatics, it is a good call to go with the DSG. But then this is not just another auto transmission, this is VW’s popular dual clutch gearbox. Shifts are quick and the gearbox is equally adept at offering shifts for economical, slow-paced driving as it is for aggressive, dynamic driving. You don’t get steering mounted paddles, though manual gear selection with the stick is possible. There is a sports mode too.

DRIVING DYNAMICS ;

The ride on the Ameo is on the stiffer side and the setup is able to absorb most bumps and imperfections without sending much back into the cabin. However, when you do hit a really deep pothole or bad imperfection the audibility of the suspension taking a beating is quite loud in the cabin. The slightly stiffer suspension setup provides decent stability at high speeds though the car tends to get flighty when encountering undulations at high speed and there is body roll when you go through the corners. However, one thing that Volkswagen has managed get right is the steering. It is precise, weighs up correctly and is an excellent tool for the ‘point and shoot’ style of driving.

BOTTOMLINE ;

The Ameo on the whole is a pretty nice car, especially when you consider the equipment you get for the money you pay along with the fact that it is a Volkswagen, and is thus a very well-engineered car. Volkswagen has learnt from its previous mistakes and is offering a bucket load features this time which adds to the Ameo’s value for money quotient.

Build quality and quality of materials used is pretty good, which gives the Ameo a more premium feel. What’s more, it is a familiar looking car though that’s something which works in its favour but could also be a bit of a turn off for some. Not a deal breaker though, especially since it drives well, has a good balance of ride and handling, and of course the fact that this car has been made specifically for India. A little thing to be proud of, no?

Porsche 911 Performance & Price In India

OVERVIEW

Porsche has launched the 2016 range of its legendary 911s and with prices starting from Rs. 1.39 crores (ex-showroom, Maharashtra) and Rs. 1.42 crores (ex-showroom, Delhi), you could almost call it a bargain, for what you get is something of a rare breed on this planet, a German with a sense of humour. The 911 family tree has remained majorly unchanged over the years, with the flat-six engine stubbornly remaining at the back. Nobody thought it would ever work, but fast forward to 2016, and these are one of the most sought after driver’s cars, known for their one-of-a-kind feel.

In a welcome move, Porsche has launched the 2016 line up of its 911s in India. The new line-up, like every other year sees minor tweaks and changes to get the 911 formula that much closer to perfection. The models that have been launched in India include the 911 Carrera Cabriolet, the 911 Carrera S, the 911 Turbo and the 911 Turbo S Cabriolet. All of these cars were showcased at the 2016 Detroit Motor Show. Get detail features, specs and price of Porsche Cars in Carzprice

DESIGN AND STYLE

Much like the rest of the 911 lineup, the GT3 was updated to the recently introduced 991.2 design. Needless to say, there isn’t a lot to talk about here since the update is more about nips and tucks, but most changes are noticeable. While the front fascia wears the same nose and headlamps, but bumper was revised with a big focus on aerodynamics. The intakes are significantly larger, while the side vents sport additional winglets for enhanced downforce.

It doesn’t appear as if Porsche modified anything on the sides, but the rear end gained new taillights and a redesigned diffuser. The light units are taken off the latest Porsche 911 and have a more angular design as well as a new LED layout. The diffuser isn’t radically different compared to the outgoing model, but the mild changes deliver optimized airflow. The carbon-fiber wings also sports minor changes, the license plate has a different shape, while the side air vents are significantly larger.All told, the new 911 GT3 isn’t that new, but I can’t say I was expecting major changes. Porsche rarely takes the revolutionary route on its cars, so it’s far from surprising that there aren’t many details to set the new and outgoing models apart.

CABIN AND COMFORT

The steering of the Porsche 911 is the typical three spoke Porsche steering. But this steering has no controls. The area is hollow. The volume and track changer is a knob extending at the lower right side of the steering. Just in front of the of the stick for scanning through the system. On the left there is a similar stick for cruise control. Behind all this are the chrome paddle shifts. The three pod instrument cluster are again typical Porsche. The A/C vents are rather simple and blend with the dash. The centre vents blend with the centre infotainment screen.

Below the vents there is a chrome strip that runs across the dash board and is really broad. There is more chrome on the door livers and around the front speakers that are on the doors too. The large screen for the infotainment is good but the icons seem old and not up to the current level of cars. Luckily this car has way less button than the likes of Macan, Cayman etc and leads to less confusion. These seats in spite of being extremely sporty are extremely comfortable. The Sports seats are comfortable and provide support even during performance driving. They come equipped with electric backrest adjustment and mechanical height and fore/aft adjustment. The seat centres are lined with Alcantara®.ISOFIX child seat preparation for the front passenger seat is available as an option and includes a deactivation function for the front passenger airbag. The Porsche equipment range of genuine accessories offers a selection of Porsche child seats specially tested and approved for Porsche cars. Get On Road price of Porsche 911 from Porsche Dealers in Hyderabad

ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION

Few engines have had as much to prove as this new 2,981cc, twin-turbocharged flat six does. In the Carrera it’s tuned to produce 370hp and 450Nm, but in the more potent Carrera S, it makes 420hp and 500Nm! These are, of course, far more significant numbers than what you’d get from the now defunct 3.4- and 3.8-litre naturally aspirated flat sixes, especially the torque figures, as is the case with most turbocharged cars. Even the performance claims – 0-100kph in 4.2sec and 3.9sec respectively are better than before. But all of this means nothing. No, in a 911, it’s all about the way the car sounds, responds, feels and makes you feel.

And I’m happy to report that it feels good. Fire it up and it sounds like a proper Porsche boxer six should (especially with the optional sport exhaust fitted), set off gently and it doesn’t feel laboured or strained. It feels naturally aspirated, and that’s the best compliment you can pay a turbocharged car. On the road, it’s comfy changing pace as we weave in and out of Abu Dhabi’s traffic, the quick and smooth seven-speed PDK dual-clutch automatic gearbox coping well with the random changes in throttle input. It’s very civilised and very comfortable, as the 911 has always been, but of course, we didn’t expect that to change.

RIDE AND HANDLING

All the wheels have been coupled with high performance internally vented and cross-drilled disc brakes that are further accompanied with four-piston aluminum monobloc fixed calipers. These brakes are integrated with anti lock braking system and Porsche ceramic composite brakes, which enables shorter braking distance even under race conditions. As far as the suspension is concerned, its front axle is paired with McPherson Strut and the rear axle is fitted with a Multi-link mechanism. This model series also comes with an electromechanical power assisted steering featuring a turning radius of 11.1 meters. Book a Test Drive for Porsche 911

SAFETY FEATURES

The car has full-sizeairbags for both the driver as well as the front passenger. Also, there are knee airbags for both of them. Porsche inbuilt Side Impact protection system (POSIP) as well as the head airbags protect you in every possible way. Three level automatic seat belt and remote locking are some of the other safety features installed.Talking about the breaking system the car has a 6-piston aluminum fixed monobloc calipers in the front whereas 4-piston aluminum fixed monobloc calipers in the rear end. With a brake disc radius of 380mm perfectly cross drilled and ventilated the car is in total control. An electric parking break is present alongwith pad wear sensors on every brake pad.

BOTTOMLINE

Needless to say, the new 911 GT3 doesn’t disappoint performance- and feature-wise and if the outgoing model is any indication, the 991.2-based coupe should be at least as exciting and popular with Porsche fanatics. I remember that last year I was thinking how cool it would be for Porsche to reinstate the manual transmission for the GT3, but I wasn’t really hoping it to happen. Well, it turns out I was wrong and I’m actually very happy that the Germans did the unexpected. The 911 GT3 deserves to continue with a manual transmission and I do hope that this won’t change with the next-generation model. Apply Car Loan for Porsche 911. Apply car loan for Porschs 911 at Carzprice

 

Jaguar F Pace Test Drive & Price In India

OVERVIEW ;

With Land Rover as a corporate sibling, the 2017 Jaguar F-Pace is targeted primarily at on-road performance driving, though all-wheel drive is standard and plenty of off-road electronics are shared between brands (for example, Rover’s Terrain Response twist-knob appears here as Adaptive Surface Response buttons). Engine options include a 2.0-liter turbodiesel good for 180 hp and 318 lb-ft, and a 3.0-liter supercharged V-6 available in two states of tune: 340 hp and 380 hp (torque peaks at 332 lb-ft on both). All are rated to tow 5,000 pounds. Jaguar offers the F-Pace in base, Premium, Prestige, and R-Sport trim specifications, with the F-Pace S as the range topper (at least after the 2,000 worldwide “First Edition” versions are gone). Each is unmistakably Jaguar in its style, stance, and road presence.

EXTERIOR AND DESIGN ;

One thing is for sure, the F-Pace screams out Jaguar from all the angles. The large grille on the fascia is the most obvious resemblance. The slim but aggressive LED headlamps are the other traditional Jaguar bits. There’s a slight bulge on the hood which makes this vehicle look aggressive. When viewed from the side, the rearward sloping roofline, the flared wheel arches, big doors and the plastic cladding at the lower section remind you that this is a big SUV. The rear end of the F-Pace is simply beautiful. The clean design approach, F-Type inspired tail lamps and rear windscreen transform the F-Pace from a gleaming metal body into a truly beautiful machine to look at. In short, the F-Pace is easily one of the most stunning creations in the world of SUVs.

INTEIOR AND CABIN ;

The interiors of the Jaguar F-Pace are pleasant and the dashboard has neatly stacked controls. The layout is driver-friendly and has a premium feel to it. The SUV gets a digital instrument cluster which different types of displays to suit your needs. The steering feels great to hold and is just the perfect size. The centre console gets a large touchscreen with the uConnect system. You also get a rotary gear knob that pops out when you turn on the ignition. You also get ambient lighting with a variety of colour options that can be toggled from the touchscreen. Just like Land Rover SUVs, even the F-Pace comes with power window switches on the window panes unlike the door pads on other cars.

The seating position is high up and the driving position is excellent. Frontal visibility is good but rearward view is a bit limited. The large ORVMs really help matters though. The front seats are a bit stiff but feel comfortable nonetheless. Space at the rear is also good with decent amount of knee room and good shoulder and head space. The panoramic sunroof also adds to the airy feel in the cabin. The AC does its job well but what really impressed us is the way the cabin cocoons you from the outside world with the splendid insulation.

The boot is well-shaped and can carry a decently good amount of luggage. However, the cover for the spare well is really thick and eats into space. In terms of features, the F-Pace comes with a Meridian audio system which is aural bliss, though the speakers did seem to create a distorted noise at higher volumes. You also get a 360-degree view from the various cameras installed around the car and that helps matters while parking in tight spaces since the F-Pace is quite wide. I also liked the valet option on the infotainment system which limits the functions of the car when you’re giving it to your chauffeur or a hotel valet. The headlamps are powerful and light up the road like daylight.

ENGINE AND PERFORMANCE ;

Driving around in city traffic, this SUV does the job without throwing a tantrum. With a light foot, the engine upshifts early and there’s ample torque lower down the rev range to potter around. It will build speeds in a relaxed manner while the passengers are cocooned from the outside world, inside the F-Pace’s cabin. Demand for aggressive acceleration in Sport and there’s a lusty gush of torque that makes it lunge forward riding a wave of boost. Once past 2,000rpm power delivery is smooth yet punchy all the way till 4,500rpm, after which progress is slow. The meat of the engine is its mid-range performance. Due to the 700Nm of torque available from 2,000rpm, overtaking fast-moving vehicles out on the open road is simply effortless and the engine doesn’t warrant a downshift too often either. For most scenarios the eight-speed gearbox does the job really well without the need for a manual intervention. However, use the paddles and the shifts aren’t as quick as the double clutch units or even the BMW’s ZF transmission. But in manual mode, you can hold on to a gear.

There are four driving modes to choose from – Dynamic, Normal, Eco and Rain Ice Snow which change the throttle response, steering weight and gearshift pattern to suit different conditions. In versions equipped with adaptive dampers (First Edition), their stiffness is electrically controlled too. To extract the best out of the engine and gearbox, engage the Dynamic driving mode and the gearbox in Sport mode and watch the performance liven up even more with the speedo needle going past high speeds with a blink of an eye.

Another outstanding feature is this SUV’s ride and handling. It’s a performance SUV but there’s no hint of underlying stiffness to the suspension and it irons out the rough stuff in a very mature manner and the faster you go, it gets better. This is also the ideal SUV in which you’d attack a good set of corners and you are assured of a wide grin at the end of it. Out on a twisty section of road is where this SUV shines. Grip levels are great thanks to the stiff springs, all-wheel drive system and the fat 255 section tyres, which encourage the driver to drive fast around corners. The car is capable of carrying incredibly high speeds through bends. If the speed of the vehicle is too high while tackling curves, the torque vectoring system will independently apply the brakes to either or both the inside wheels to reduce understeer and hold the line better. There is some body roll but for an SUV this tall, but it’s actually very well controlled and the sharp and precise steering only adds to the brilliant driving dynamics of this car. RIDE AND HANDLING ;

Jaguar will tell you all day long that the F-Pace is a ‘performance crossover’ infused with technology and ability borrowed from the F-Type. That’s a load of cobblers. Yes it has the same suspension layout as the F-Type, and a similar name, but this is a large SUV that size-wise sits somewhere between the Porsche Macan and Cayenne (although at 1,861kg it’s 80kg less than the equivalent Macan, thanks to its snazzy all-aluminium platform).

Body control is tighter than any Land Rover model, but let’s not pretend it changes direction like an F-Type – that’s physics. Dial back your binary inputs and drive briskly, not manically, and it responds with slick, balanced movements. Ultimately, its safe zone is fast, open roads where it gobbles up big mileages in supreme comfort. Naturally, the big V6 diesel and petrol are appealing, but this is also the best home yet for the 2.0-litre Ingenium engine.

SAFETY AND SECURITY ;

The Jaguar F-Pace hasn’t yet been put through Euro NCAP’s stringent safety tests, so we can’t tell you how it might protect you and your family in an accident compared with other large SUVs.

However, automatic emergency braking is on hand to help your avoid a shunt in the first place, as is a lane-departure warning system. On the options list you’ll find blind-spot monitoring and reverse traffic detection. The latter alerts you about moving vehicles when backing out of a parking space or your driveway.

Lane keep assist, which can actively apply steering inputs to keep you in your lane on the motorway, and a driver tiredness monitor, are available as an option.

BOTTOMLINE ;

The F-Pace’s best attributes have to be the purity of its design and its sporty handling. Yeah, it looks too much like the other Jags, but that is desirable, and it is still a tough task for a designer to come up with a design that stays true to its lineage. Starting from ₹68.4 lakh, Jaguar has chosen not go with an aggressive pricing strategy, making the F-Pace more expensive than some of the German competitors in the same size class The top-end First Edition variant is priced at ₹1.12 crore.

Jaguar is a late comer to the SUV/ crossover party, and there are probably a few Jag fans shaking their heads disapprovingly about the F-Pace. But who expected Porsche’s SUVs to be doing so well when the German sports carmaker launched its first such vehicle in the Cayenne.Book a test drive for Jaguar F Pace in carzprize