Affordable Benefits Of Virtual Business Phone Number

It can be dangerous to give out your phone number to people you don’t know, and that’s normally the case when a website asks you for your phone number. Fortunately, just like with anonymous email addresses and debit cards, you can also grab an anonymous, virtual phone number to mask your real number.When you use a virtual phone number, only that number is known, not your real number, even though the virtual number might ring your real phone to establish the phone call. Anyone you call, and anyone who calls your virtual number, cannot see your real phone number.. Check for Affordable Benefits Of Virtual Business Phone Number in Linkedphone

For any business, every customer call is important. Yet little attention is paid to maintaining a high quality incoming call management system resulting in considerable damage to brand reputation and incalculable business opportunity losses. Worse, the management has no control or information about:

No. of calls received

No. of calls missed

Who handled the call

What was spoken during the call

By greeting, routing and tracking all incoming calls received by the business, the Cloud Based Business Telephony Solution provides a simple, cost effective and yet highly efficient way of handling business inquiries.

CLOUD BASED BUSINESS HELPLINE SOLUTION FEATURES

Customers can choose a 10 digit mobile or toll-free number for the business Advertise the same in all business communications and stationary Employees can be grouped into departments and assigned extension numbers and calls routed to the department could be delivered to employees within that department automatically, wherever they may be, on their mobile phones. When lines are busy callers are automatically re-routed to other available numbers. Automatically managing incoming business calls,

Every caller is greeted professionally, tirelessly, 24×7 Not a single call is missed. All caller details are captured in real time 24×7 and business owners and managers can review the same in real time

Who should buy it

Designed to serve the requirements of those modern day technology enabled businesses,

Lot of incoming calls, everyday of the week A mobile workforce that needs to stay connect with the office at all times Where customers require extensive pre sale counseling or support by qualified employees Where customer regularly place repeat order on phone. These solutions are already deployed across many market verticals including Educational Institution, Online Matrimony, Retail, IT, Real Estate, FMCG sectors.

Advertising campaigns are becoming increasingly expensive and brand managers are asked to monitor campaign performance continually to derive highest value for money spent. In a multi-platform, multi-location campaign it is virtually impossible for brand managers to understand in real time:

Which campaign message or outlet is performing the best? What is the volume of inquires generated and which time of the day? Who handled the incoming inquiries and what transpired during this conversation? Till now real time campaign ROI measurement was partially possible only in an online campaign. By tracking all incoming calls generated by the campaign, cloud telephony based Campaign Response Management Solution provides a simple and yet highly effective real time solution to businesses.

These solutions will help you to manage your business, away from office also. It provides the most economic way to own a telephony solution for an entire company which earlier a big companies used to dream of.

If you think all the customers calls are important for your business or you are not able to identify where the incoming calls are coming from Cloud Telephony is the one stop solution for streamlining all the call management, tracking through Virtual IVRS and Virtual PBX.

 

 

Maruti Suzuki Ciaz Engine & Performance

Maruti Suzuki Ciaz Overview

The new Maruti Ciaz is a big deal. Is it revolutionary, unique or even game changing? Maybe not so much in the segment it operates in wherein you already have the likes of the new Honda City and the Hyundai Verna but for Maruti Suzuki, the Ciaz is all this and more… Here’s why?  Check for Maruti cars Price, Review, Features & Specs at CarzPrice

Now, this isn’t a new segment for Maruti; it has had the SX4 in the past. But, even with its large wheels and ground clearance, roomy interior and a big boot, the SX4 struggled. The reason: perception. No one wanted a full-fledged C-Segment car from a maker of small, affordable hatchbacks and compact sedans. But now with the Maruti Ciaz, Maruti finally has a product to draw you and me away from the Honda Citys and Hyundai Vernas of the world. This should be interesting.

Maruti Suzuki Ciaz Exterior & Style

The design of the Ciaz is based on the Suzuki Authentics concept which was showcased first at the 2014 Shanghai Motor Show in April and then shown in production form as the China-spec Alivio sedan. It gets an aggressive front fascia with a trapezoidal front grille that features ample amount of chrome. The sweptback headlights and the elongated hood further enhance its street presence. The side profile is a rather conservative affair but one that works for Maruti Suzuki. It features delicately flared wheel arches, chrome door handles and a strong shoulder line which works well with the forward leaning stance of the car.

At the rear, the Ciaz gets the standard wrap around tail lamps which lend the car a premium look. The rear bumper is large and includes integrated reflectors. There’s also a lip spoiler and chrome badges across all variants.

Maruti Suzuki Ciaz Interior & Space

The interiors of the Ciaz are completely new and different from any other Maruti car. The neatly laid out dashboard has a seven-inch touchscreen system. The higher variants get automatic climate control. The steering is shared with other models but it gets a leather wrap as also the gear knob. The top variant gets leather upholstery also. The Ciaz is comes loaded with features like push button start, keyless entry, bluetooth connectivity, navigation, reverse parking camera and sensors.

The Ciaz is not stingy on spacious too. There is good head room and leg room available. The seats are not the best but provide good comfort. It could have done with some more under thigh support. The boot is large and can fit in quite a lot of luggage with ease. This makes it a very practical sedan that can be used for weekend getaways too. The Ciaz S offers all black interiors and even the centre console has grey chrome finish on it.

Maruti Suzuki Ciaz Engine & Performance

While the Ciaz doesn’t get an entirely new motor, it does get a fairly reworked version of Maruti’s own K14 petrol unit found on the Ertiga. The tweaks to the engine focus on improving driveability and maximising fuel economy. To achieve that, Maruti has modified the cylinder head to raise the compression ratio from 10:1 to 11:1 and the revised head design allows for a better tumble of airflow at low speeds. Also, the air inlet track has been lengthened to further improve low-end torque. To counter heating problems and engine-knocking, issues that are typically associated with higher compression motors, long reach spark plugs and a more efficient oil pump have made their way into the motor. Despite all these changes though, peak power and torque figures have pretty much stayed the same.

On the face of it, the petrol version doesn’t come across as enthusiastic since a power output of 91bhp (at 6000rpm) is a pretty ordinary number for a mid-size sedan. However, in-gear timings are good – the Ciaz is pretty responsive and has a nice urgency about town. The engine pulls quite well from low revs and you don’t have to work the gearbox much; and even when you do, the light clutch and slick shifting ’box (albeit not as nice as the Swift’s) takes away the effort from city driving. But find an open stretch and explore the K14 motor’s powerband, and you soon realise the power delivery is pretty flat. The mid-range isn’t particularly strong; this engine doesn’t like to be spun hard and gets pretty noisy as the tachometer closes in on its modest 6,200rpm redline. Check for Maruti car dealers in India

Flat-out performance is fairly decent, with the dash to 100kph taking 12.02 seconds. However, it’s the unenthusiastic way the Ciaz picks up speed that makes you feel that it’s not as quick as the numbers suggest.

Maruti Suzuki Ciaz Driving Dynamics

Now if you like driving, the Ciaz might not be the car for you. It has a precise steering and you eventually learn how much steering input to dial in but it isn’t great on feedback. It just isn’t in the same league as the Volkswagens and the Skodas. But, if you are looking for a comfortable long distance cruiser, you will like the Ciaz’s easy nature. Good straight line stability and potent braking, is of course an added plus.

The Maruti Ciaz rides well too. It has been setup for comfort over all else and it’s evident in the way the car rides. It’s softly sprung, so at slow speeds and over broken roads, it remains comfortable. However, at higher speeds and particularly over undulating roads and with load, the Maruti Ciaz does tend to wallow.

Maruti Suzuki Ciaz Safety & Security

Maruti doesn’t offer airbags and ABS as standard on the base V variant of the Ciaz but the other three variants are equipped with these safety features. It is the least equipped car when compared to its immediate rivals, the Hyundai Verna and Honda City in terms of safety. The Verna gets ABS standard across all variants while its range topping variant gets 6 airbags. The City comes with both ABS and airbags as standard on all its variants. The Ciaz hasn’t been crash tested yet by the Global NCAP but considering the low weight of the car (despite being the biggest car in segment) compared to the rivals, we believe the structural strength might not be up to the mark. When it comes to after sales service, Maruti is second to none and has the biggest dealership network in the country by a mile.

Maruti Suzuki Ciaz Price

Maruti Suzuki Ciaz Ex-Showroom Price in Hyderabad ranges from 7,99,026/- (Ciaz Sigma Petrol) to 11,97,792/- (Ciaz S Diesel). Get best offers for Maruti Suzuki Ciaz from Maruti Suzuki Dealers in Hyderabad. Check for Ciaz price in Hydearbad

Maruti Suzuki Ciaz Conclussion

The Ciaz also managed to delight us with its ride quality. The stiffer chassis and the suspension set up gives the right mix of rigidity and compliant ride quality. Straight line stability is excellent. Though we cant quite comment on cornering ability after the short test drive we had, it would be safe to say that the Ciaz would match segment benchmarks.

We feel that Maruti Suzuki potentially has a better premium sedan in the Ciaz than some of the competition. Features like the rear sunscreen, SmartPlay infotainment system sand personal reading lamps for the rear occupants are big pluses for buyers in the segment. We have to wait for the launch for the price announcement, but a Rs. 8 lakh to Rs. 10.5 lakh range will possibly leave the competition palpitating.

Best Practices for Building Angular.js Apps

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Update 2016–04–17: I wrote this article almost 2 years ago for Angular 1.x. This article is still tremendously popular somehow, but I want to warn that it may not be the best for Angular 2.x or other methods of building JS front-ends. I have spent almost all my time writing CLI code since I wrote this, so I have really no context to say if this is still the best practice I considered it to be in 2014. Still, I offer a simple solution that many have said they prefer to more complicated setups.

Burke Holland had a fantastic post explaining how Angular loads an application and comparing the merits of browserify vs require.js in an Angular app.

I’ve worked with Angular on quite a few apps at this point, and have seen many different ways to structure them. I’m writing a book on architecting Angular apps right now with the MEAN stack and as such have researched heavily into this specific topic. I think I’ve set on a pretty specific structure I’m very happy with. It’s a simpler approach than what Burke Holland has proposed.

I must note that if I was on a project with his structure, I would be content. It’s good.

Before we start though, the concept of modules in the world of Angular can be a bit confusing, so let me lay out the current state of affairs.

What modules are in JavaScript JavaScript comes with no ability to load modules. A “module” means different things to different people. For this article, let’s use this definition:

Modules allow code to be compartmentalized to provide logical separation for the developers. In JavaScript, it also prevents the problem of conflicting globals. People new to JavaScript get a little confused about why we make such a big deal about modules. I want to make one thing clear: Modules are NOT for lazy-loading JavaScript components when needed. Require.js does have this functionality, but that is not the reason it is important. Modules are important due to the language not having support for it, and JavaScript desperately needing it.

A module can be different things. It could be Angular, lodash (you’re not still using underscore, are you?), shared code in your organization, some gist you found online, or separating features out inside your codebase.

JavaScript doesn’t support modules, so we’ve traditionally had a few various approaches. (Feel free to skip this next section if you understand JavaScript modules)

.noConflict() Let me illustrate the problem. Let’s say you want to include jQuery in your project. jQuery will define the global variable ‘$’. If, in your code, you have an existing variable ‘$’ those variables will conflict. For years, we got around this problem with a .noConflict() function. Basically .noConflict() allows you to change the variable name of the library you’re using.

If you had this problem, you would use it like this:

This has been a common practice in most JavaScript libraries, but it’s not a fantastic solution. It doesn’t provide very good compartmentalizing of code, it forces you to declare things before you use them, and it requires the imported code (either a library or your own code) to actually implement a .noConflict() function.

If that’s confusing, read up on it. It’s important to understand the problem before you continue onto the solutions below.

Nobody was happy with .noConflict(), so they started looking into other ways to solve the problem. We have 4 solutions worth mentioning in this context:

Require.js (Implementation of AMD) Browserify (Implementation of CommonJS) Angular dependency injection ES6 modules Each one has its pros and cons, and each works quite a bit differently. You can even use 1 or 2 in tandem (Burke used 2). I’ll cover what each does, how they work with Angular, and which one I suggest.

Sample App Let’s get a little Angular app together so we can talk about it.

Here is a simple app that lists users off Github. The code is here, but it’s the completed version we will build in this post. Read through for no spoilers!

All the JavaScript could be in this one file:

First we declare an ‘app’ object that is our module. We then define a service ‘GithubSvc’ with one function that can serve us users from Github.

After that, we define a controller that uses the service to load that array into $scope. (This is the HTML page that renders it)

Splitting into separate files The trouble is that this code is all in one file. Totally unreasonable for a real app. Maybe I’m a curmudgeon, but when I first started looking at Angular and the code samples all showed how to do this, all I wanted to see was a real world solution with proper separation.

I would like to have this code in a structure like this:

src/module.js src/github/github.svc.js src/github/github.ctrl.js Note: If this app got large, it might make sense to have a separate ‘github’ module as well.

The alternate way to do this would be to split things out by functionality rather than part of the codebase:

src/module.js src/services/github.svc.js src/controllers/github.ctrl.js I don’t have a strong preference either way. Probably very large apps would benefit from the former, and smaller ones the latter. For website design services visit Vivid Designs

Regardless, without using a module loader like browserify or require.js, we would have to add a script tag for every one of these files. That’s a no go. That could easily grow to hundreds of files.

There are performance reasons why you don’t want to have tons of script tags too. The browser does pipeline them, but it can only do so many at a time. They have overhead, and the latency would be killer to our friends outside of California.

So here is the goal:

We need a way to have many Angular files in dev, but they need to be loaded into the browser in bulk (not a script tag for each one).

This is why people look to module loaders like require.js or browserify. Angular allows you to logically separate out code, but not files. I’m going to show an easier way, but first let’s examine the available module loaders.

Require.js — Too complicated Require.js was the first major push towards coming up with a consistent way to have modules inside of JavaScript. Require.js allows you to define dependencies inside a JavaScript file that you depend on. It runs inside the browser and is capable of loading modules as needed.

It accomplishes 2 general tasks, loading of modules and handling the load order.

Unfortunately it’s really complicated to setup, requires your code to be written in a specific way, certainly has the steepest learning curve, and can’t deal with circular dependencies well — and that can happen when trying to use a module system on top of Angular.

Burke Holland covered the issues with using require.js with Angular very well, so I encourage you to read that for a clearer reason why you should not use Angular with require.js.

Working with RequireJS and AngularJS was a vacation on Shutter Island. On the surface everything looks very normal. Under that surface is Ben Kingsley and a series of horrific flashbacks. — Burke Holland The ability for require.js to load modules on demand is also something that won’t work with Angular (at least, in a reasonable situation). That seems to be something people want, but I’ve certainly never worked on a project that needed it.

I want to emphasize that last point as people get this wrong: Module systems are not so that you only load the code you need. Yes require.js does do that, but it’s not why require.js is useful. Modules are useful to logically separate code for developers to reason about it easier.

In any case, it’s a bad solution and I won’t show you how to do it. I bring it up because people often ask me how to integrate require.js with Angular.

Browserify — A much better module loader Where require.js has the browser load the modules, browserify runs on the server before it runs in the browser. You can’t take a browserify file and run it in a browser, you have to ‘bundle’ it first.

It uses a similar format (and is almost 100% compatible with) the Node.js module loading. It looks like this:

It’s a really pretty, easy to read format. You simply declare a variable and ‘require()’ your module into it. Writing code that exports a module is very easy too.

In Node, it’s great. The reason it can’t work in the browser, however, is that it’s synchronous. The browser would have to wait when hitting one of those require sections, then make an http call to load the code in. Synchronous http in a browser is an absolute no-no.

It works in Node since the files are on the local filesystem, so the time it takes to do one of those ‘requires()’ is very fast.

So with browserify, you can take code like this and run it with browserify and it will combine all the files together in a bundle that the browser can use. Once again, Burke’s article covers using browserify with Angular very well.

By the way, if everything I just said about browserify is confusing, don’t worry about it. It’s certainly more confusing than the solution I’m about to propose.

It is a great tool I would jump to use on a non-Angular project. With Angular, however, we can do something simpler.

Angular Dependency Injection — Solves most of our problems Go back and look at our sample app’s app.js. I want to point out a couple of things:

It doesn’t matter what order we create the service or the controller. Angular handles that for us with its built-in Dependency Injection. It also allows us to do things like mocking out the service in a unit test. It’s great, and my number one favorite feature inside Angular.

Having said that, with this method, we do need to declare the module first to use that ‘app’ object. It’s the only place that order of declarations matter in Angular, but it’s important.

What I want to do, is simply concatenate all the files together into one, then require just that JavaScript file in our HTML. Because the app object has to be declared first, we just need to make sure that it’s declared before anything else.

Gulp Concat To do this, I will be using Gulp. Don’t worry about learning a newfangled tool though, I’m going to use it in a very simple way and you can easily port this over to Grunt, Make, or whatever build tool you want (shockingly, even asset pipeline). You just need something that can concat files.

I’ve played around with all the popular build systems and Gulp is far and away my favorite. When it comes to building css and javascript, specifically, it’s bliss.

You might be thinking I’m just replacing one build tool (browserify) with another (gulp), and you would be correct. Gulp, however, is much more general purpose. You can compose this Gulp config with other tools like minification, CoffeeScript precompilation (if you’re into that sort of thing), sourcemaps, rev hash appending, etc. Yes it’s nothing browserify can’t do, but once you learn how to do it with Gulp you can do the same on any other asset (like css). Ultimately it’s much less to learn.

You can use it to process png’s, compile your sass, start a dev node server, or running any code you can write in node. It’s easy to learn, and will provide a consistent interface to your other developers. It provides us a platform to extend on later.

I would much rather just type ‘gulp watch’ and have that properly watch all my static assets in dev mode than have to run ‘watchify’, a separate node server, a separate sass watcher, and whatever else you need to keep your static files up to date.

First I’ll install Gulp and gulp-concat (gotta be in the project and global):

$ npm install –global gulp $ npm install –save-dev gulp gulp-concat By the way, you’ll need a package.json in your app and have Node installed. Here’s a little trick I do to start my Node apps (npm init is too whiny):

$ echo ‘{}’ > package.json Then toss in this gulpfile.js:

This is a simple task that takes in the JavaScript files in src/ and concatenates them into app.js. Because it expects this array, any file named module.js will be included first. Don’t worry too much about understanding this code, when we get to minification I’ll clear it up.

If you want to play along at home, use these files, then run ‘gulp js’ to build the assets. Donezo.

For more on Gulp, read my article on setting up a full project with it.

Icky Globals We can do better. You know how you create that ‘app’ variable? That’s a global. Probably not a problem to have one ‘app’ global, but it might be a problem when we grow to have more and more modules, they may conflict.  Web development company in New Delhi

Luckily Angular can solve this for us very easily. The function angular.module() is both a getter and a setter. If you call it with 2 arguments:

That’s a setter. You just created a module ‘app’ that has ‘ngRoute’ as a dependency. (I won’t be using ngRoute here, but I wanted to show what it looks like with a dependent module)

Calling that setter will also return the module as an object (that’s what we put into var app). Unfortunately you can only call it once. Disappointingly, getting this stuff wrong throws nasty error messages that can be frustrating to newbies. Stick to the xxx method and all will be good though.

If we call angular.module() with a single argument:

It’s a getter and also returns the module as an object, but we can call it as many times as we want. For this reason, we can rewrite our components from this:

The difference is subtle and might seem innocuous to new JavaScript developers. The advanced ones are nodding along now though. To maintain a large JavaScript codebase is to prevent the usage of globals.

To you pedants: I realize that there is still a global ‘angular’ object, but there’s almost certainly no point in avoiding that.

Here we have a pretty well functioning way to build the assets, but there are a few more steps we need to get to the point of a fine-tuned build environment. Namely, it’s a pain to have to run ‘gulp js’ every time we want to rebuild ‘app.js’.

Gulp Watch This is really easy, and I think the code speaks for itself (Lines 10-12):

This just defines a ‘gulp watch’ task we can call that will fire off the ‘js’ task every time a file matching ‘src/**/*.js’ changes. Blammo.

Minification Alright, let’s talk minification. In Gulp we create streams from files (gulp.src), then pipe them through various tools (minification, concatenation, etc), and finally output them to a gulp.dest pipe. If you know unix pipes, this is the same philosophy.

In other words, we just need to add minification as a pipe. First, install gulp-uglify to minify:

$ npm install -D gulp-uglify

But we have a problem! It has munged the function argument names Angular needs to do dependency injection! Now our app doesn’t work. If you’re not familiar with this problem, read up.

We can either use the ugly array syntax in your code, or we can introduce ng-gulp-annotate.

NPM install:

$ npm install -D gulp-ng-annotate And here’s the new gulpfile:

I hope you’re starting to see the value in Gulp here. How I can use a conventional format of Gulp plugins to quickly solve each of these build problems I am running into.

Sourcemaps Everyone loves their debugger. The issue with what we’ve built so far is that it’s now this minified hunk of JavaScript. If you want to console.log in chrome, or run a debugger, it won’t be able to show you relevant info.

Here’s a Gulp task that will do just that! (Install gulp-sourcemaps)

Why Concat is Better Concat works better here because it’s simpler. Angular is handling all of the code loading for us, we just need to assist it with the files. So long as we get that module setter before the getters, we have nothing to worry about.

It’s also great because any new files we just add into the directory. No manifest like we would need in browserify. No dependencies like we would need in require.js.

It’s also just generally one less moving part, one less thing to learn.

What we built Here is the final code. It’s an awesome starting point to build out your Angular app.

It’s got structure. It’s got a dev server. It’s got minification. It’s got source maps. It’s got style. (The Vincent Chase kind, not the CSS kind) It doesn’t have globals. It doesn’t have shitloads of <script> tags. It doesn’t have a complex build setup. I tried to make this not about Gulp, but as you can tell: I freaking love the thing. As I mentioned earlier, you could achieve a similar setup with anything that can concat.

If there is interest, I could easily extend this to add testing/css/templates/etc. I already have the code. EDIT: https://github.com/dickeyxxx/angular-boilerplate

Third-party code For third-party code: if it’s something available on a CDN (Google CDN, cdnjs, jsdelivr, etc), use that. If the user has already loaded it from another site, the browser will reuse it. They also have very long cache times.

If it’s something not available on a CDN, I would still probably use a new script tag but load it off the same server as the app code. Bower is good for keeping these sorts of things in check.

If you have a lot of third-party code, you should look into minifying and concatenating them like above, but I would keep it separate from your app code so you don’t have just one huge file.

ES6 Modules — The real solution The next version of JavaScript will solve this problem with built-in modules. They worked hard to ensure that it works well for both fans of CommonJS (browserify) and AMD (require.js). This version is a ways out, and you probably won’t be able to depend on the functionality without a shim of some kind for at least a year, probably a few. When it does come out, however, this post will be a relic explaining things you won’t need to worry about (or at least it’ll be horrifically incorrect).

Angular 2.0 It’s worth mentioning that Angular 2.0 will use ES6 modules, and at that point we’ll be in bliss. It’s nowhere close to release though, so for now, if you want to use Angular, you need a different option. Angular 2.0 will be a dream. It’s going to look a lot more like a series of useful packages than a framework, allowing you to pick and choose functionality, or bake them into an existing framework (like Ember or Backbone).

Angular 2.0 will use a separate library di.js that will handle all of this. It’s way simpler, and it’s only a light layer on top of ES6 modules. We should be able to easily use it in all apps, not just Angular apps. The unfortunate thing for you is that you will need to deal with the crufty state of affairs with JavaScript modules until then.

Man. I love all these great ways JavaScript is improving, but god damn is it a lot to keep learning.

If you’d like to learn more about Angular, check out my book on creating apps with the MEAN stack.

Source

A Beginner’s Portfolio

Clark Nelson

One of the first things everyone does when they are trying to enter the industry is to create a portfolio or personal site. This is an obvious choice because you don’t have any assigned work and are allowed unlimited creative freedom to create whatever you like. Actually, portfolios are quite challenging as a designer’s first website but i’m here to help you. If you are looking for website design for your company check Vivid Designs 

As someone new to the industry, an aspiring designer probably has little to fill their portfolio with. Content is the backbone of any site, and you want to avoid releasing a website with nothing worth saying. Adapting a policy of minimalism is always a wise idea when working with very little, but this style is sometimes challenging for new designers to understand and master.

A website should be created with a specific purpose in mind, and must be designed to accomplish that goal. When building your first website it’s easy to let it get out of control by adding features and sections that don’t make sense. It is tempting to create something that expresses your taste in things such as music, games, or other recreational activities. Your personality should show through the design of the site, employeers don’t need to know every detail. Web development company in Hyderabad

A portfolio must work to convey the personality of the designer that created it. Your biggest tools in this department are color and typography, use them wisely to give off the impression you want to make. If you lack enough work to define your personality, consider adding some flair but going overboard can subtract from your professionalism. You are trying to create a foundation with which you will add to in the future, as you start to gain work experience.

Your first portfolio is a learning experience. No one expects it to be perfect. This is a great opportunity to experiment with current trends and new technologies. There are plenty of places to find out what the best designers have been putting into their sites. https://dribbble.com/search?q=portfolio

Don’t be afraid to get your hands dirty and then start over again. Learn about prototyping and use it to experiment and find a layout that works for you.

Follow conventions. Many new designers and developers try interface ideas that they’ve had in the past and find out that they don’t work to well in practice. Let someone use your website and see if they can figure out where to click and scroll, you will be supprised.

I wish you the best of luck designing your new website! If you need any help or have a question let me know 🙂 https://clarknelson.com

Mahindra KUV100 NXT Facelift Review & First Drive

Mahindra KUV100 NXT Overview

When Mahindra & Mahindra MD Dr Pawan Goenka was introducing the 2017 Mahindra KUV100 NXT compact SUV at its launch, he was quick to address the big question: Why such an early refresh for a new model launched only last year. At the time, he noted that shorter timelines are the new norm with manufacturers in India launching new vehicles in quick succession and shortening shelf lives of existing products. There is a push to capture the constantly growing sub-4m compact SUV market. At the same time, the KUV100 NXT facelift is Mahindra’s attempt to capture a market that had hitherto been buying only small cars – the first-time car buyer.You see, as diverse as its portfolio of utility and sport utility vehicles as well as the odd sedan may have been, Mahindra has never before had a vehicle for this particular customer. And the manufacturer seems to have done things right, as the original Mahindra KUV100 has attracted around 60,000 customers over the past 21 months. Of these, close to 50 per cent have been first-time car buyers, and 15 per cent women customers, Goenka had said.With a diverse, new customer base, Mahindra now looks to keep the ball rolling with the 2017 Mahindra KUV100 NXT facelift that gets 40 new features. It is also of essence for Mahindra to popularise its smallest SUV platform, which is slated to become the first Mahindra SUV to be electrfied in a year’s time. For information on contact details of Mahindra car dealers in Pune

Check for Mahindra KUV100 NXt On Road Price in Kolkata at CarzPrice

Mahindra KUV100 NXT Exteriors

While most of the design is unchanged, the Mahindra KUV100 NXT has some immediately noticeable changes. The clamshell bonnet isn’t any different from its predecessor, but the headlights, while retaining their basic shape, now feature twin pods, with restyled indicators and DRLs. The front bumper design has been updated to feature a more distinctive air dam, with the reshaped fog-lights getting body colour surrounds. Even the slender nose grille gets more distinct chrome inserts and at the bottom of the bumper, there’s a well defined silver skid plate. Also Read – KUV100 NXT Vs Grand i10 Vs Ignis: Spec ComparisonA large silver skid plate can also be found around the back, with a redesigned rear bumper that carries over the styling sensibilities of the front bumper. Extending from the roof is a new, integrated spoiler with what the company calls ‘Aero Corners’ – basically Mahindra-speak for the extended spoiler integrating smoothly down the tailgate. The tailgate too has seen a bit of a redesign, with a new crease running across the back that adds a bit more bulk. Just like with the headlights, the overall shape of the tail lights has been carried over as has their twin-pod layout. However, they get a clear-lens cover that adds a sharp touch of modernity.

Viewed bang-on from the side, the squarish, black plastic-clad wheel arches house new 15-inch dual-tone diamond-cut alloys. If you ask me, even though they’re a far sight better than the smaller 14-inch wheels that debuted on the original KUV100, these 15-inchers still look a bit disproportionate in the car’s profile, especially considering the extra musculature added by the new character line running across the bottom part of the doors. An extra bit of pizzaz that’s noticeable from the side, as well as the front actually, are turn indicators integrated into the new, electrically-operated, power-folding ORVMs.Generally speaking, while the styling formula hasn’t changed in the grander scheme of things, the KUV100 does look more attractive than before. And in the two-tone paint scheme of our test car, with its black roof, as well as A, B and C pillars, it even felt a bit evocative of the Range Rover Evoque from certain angles. Also Read – Mahindra To Launch KUV100 NXT Electric In 2019

Mahindra KUV100 NXT Interiors

Mahindra has touched on many aspects that have made the KUV100 NXT look more stylish. To begin with, the interiors are now all black. The look and feel of these plastics have seen a big improvement. The materials certain now look a lot better than before. There is a texture that does look better. Moving on to the steering wheel, it is the same but now it is black. Small and easy to grip. The instrument cluster is the same too. Made up of twin dials and it has only two tripmeters on it. There isn’t anything different on it. Mahindra KUV100 NXT rear seatThe centre console is where the major change has been made. This now has a 7-inch touchscreen system. It is smooth and responsive. This thing gets driver information system like mileage, distance to empty and reverse parking sensors. New AC controls have been added too. This makes it look better and more aesthetic. The seat fabric has seen an upgrade too. the quality feels much better.

Moving on to the space, there is more than sufficient space for two in the front and three at the back. There is ample of knee room and head room for the rear passengers. The front seats can be used for 3 people, but the third passenger will find it tight. But the middle seat can be converted into an arm rest and what a lovely arm rest it is to have. In terms of storage, 1-litre bottles can fit easily in the front and rear rows, there is an under-tray storage in the co-driver’s seat. The rear seating central tunnel is flat. This even has storage underneath it. The boot isn’t very large, and even the access to it is poor.

Mahindra KUV100 NXT Performance

The engines offered on the Mahindra KUV100 NXT are the same as before. You get a 1.2-litre petrol engine producing 82 HP of power and 112 Nm of torque mated to a 5-speed manual transmission. The diesel engine is also a 1.2-litre unit maxing out at 77 HP of power and 190 Nm of torque. The oil burner too gets a manual gearbox but Mahindra will start offering an AMT next year onwards. The car that we got for testing was the diesel variant. The engine is smooth and NVH levels have also definitely improved and the cabin feels pretty silent. The engine noise can be heard in the cabin only at high RPMs.The diesel motor also offers pretty good driveability and makes the KUV fairly easy to drive around. Power is adequate for normal city and highway runs and a regular driver won’t really complain. The KUV also gets a Power mode but it doesn’t make a very big difference to the way it drives. Fuel efficiency from the diesel engine is good and in the city you can expect 16-17 km/l while on the highways expect that figure to touch 19 km/l too. The clutch is very light and the 5-speed manual gearbox is matched nicely to the engine and it is also pretty slick.

Mahindra KUV100 NXT Driving

Now, the suspension of the Mahindra KUV100 NXT is well-suited to our roads and the ride quality at low speeds is comfortable enough but as the speeds increase, there is a lot of vertical movement for passengers and it gets pretty annoying. The steering feels heavy and doesn’t really inspire confidence at high speeds. Even on the handling front, the KUV100 hates being driven aggressively and is more suited to cruising. The brakes felt very spongy and the feeling is very scary when you stomp the brake pedal at high speeds because there is just no confidence. Mahindra has also improved the approach and departure angles of the car, meaning you can tackle bad roads easily. However, don’t expect the KUV100 to tackle hard-core off-roads.

Mahindra KUV100 NXT Safety

Braking system is formed by the ventilated disc brakes in the front and drum brakes in the rear. Other vital braking features inset to support the brakes affixed in front and back comprise of anti-lock-braking system along with electronic brake force distribution, which is standard across all variants. Standard safety features on board are automatic door lock, central door locking, and door open indicator. Other safety features available on the SUV are child safety locks on rear doors, anti-slip clips for driver side door mats, ISOFIX child seat mount on rear seat, engine immobiliser, anti-theft security alarm, and dual airbags are available is available on all the plus variants along with the range topping variant.

Mahindra KUV100 NXT Price

Mahindra Kuv100 Nxt Ex-Showroom Price in Chennai ranges from 4,41,654/- (KUV100 NXT K2 Petrol) to 7,42,886/- (KUV100 NXT K8 Dual Tone Diesel). Get best offers for Mahindra Kuv100 Nxt from Mahindra Dealers in Chennai. Check for KUV100 NXT price in Chennai

Mahindra KUV100 NXT Bottomline

The Mahindra KUV100 NXT feels like a very confused product in the segment it is positioned in. While it is definitely practical and easy to drive, which our folks will appreciate, the styling is quirky even now and the driving dynamics of the car are nothing to write about. Mahindra is positioning this as a compact SUV but we all know that it sure isn’t one. Competing with some of the top-selling cars in India, the KUV100 NXT faces some tough rivalry and the only reasons why you should consider one are the 6-seater configuration (albeit not too comfortable) and the easy-to-drive nature.

Ford Figo Aspire Test Drive & Performance

Ford Figo Aspire Overview

Compact sedans are the latest piece of the market which everyone is after. The volumes speak for themselves and the pundits expect it to grow at a rapid rate over the next few years. The big guns are already in the fray and no one is letting up. Ford, of course, is the latest one to turn their attention to this sub-four-meter section and they bring fresh promises with them with the Figo Aspire. And although it carries the Figo badge, this showcases what the next generation Figo will rather than then existing one.

View Offers & Price on Ford Figo Aspire in Ahmedabad at CarzPrice

Ford Figo Aspire Design & Style

The compact sedan segment generally has cars which look like more of a compromise. Good looks takes a back seat here. Thats not the cars with the Ford Figo Aspire, though. This one is a very good looking car. The Ford Figo Aspire is based on Ford’s Kinetic Design 2.0. The bonnet or boot are neither too long nor short. The front design is similar to other new Fords like the Fiesta and Mondeo. There is a prominent swag line that runs across the car. The glass area is small so the car looks larger. This also makes it look well balanced and not too tall. The boot design too is good with a chrome strip that is well proportionate. Its not too flashy not too thin. The car looks premium ever from the rear.

Ford Figo Aspire Cabin & Space

After exploring the upmarket exteriors, the interiors continue to impress us considering how the previous generation Figo was. The Aspire has a touch of premium-ness to its cabin thanks to the extensive use of beige and the new dashboard, which is derived from its elder siblings. You must be very familiar with the centre console and steering wheel from the EcoSport and Fiesta. The three-spoke steering as always feels great to hold with those chunky contours and the piano black inserts look good. There are controls for the audio system and Bluetooth telephony. The stalks have been finally swapped for Indian driving style! The indicator, trip meter and dipper controls are on the right while the wiper controls are on the left-hand-side. The three-pod instrument cluster looks small in size and is a bit basic with a tiny MID display but it is quite easy to read. The headlight and fog lamp controls continue to have the European position, which is convenient and also gets the boot release button there. The rearview mirror controls are placed on the A-pillar like the old Figo and Classic that offer electric adjustment and power folding function with a tap downwards.

The Figo Aspire gets automatic climate control on the Titanium and Titanium + variants that chills the cabin quite effectively but at higher fan speeds there is a lot of noise coming out from the vents. The SYNC system with AppLink comes on the Titanium + variant that has a 4.2-inch screen. It offers CD, AUX, USB and Bluetooth connectivity with voice-activated handsfree system. It streams music, which sounds good through its 4-speaker audio system but at high volumes the bass tends to get distorted. There is an emergency assist system that activates when the car experiences a collision and automatically calls the emergency responders providing location and vehicle information. The AppLink system currently works with four apps including Glympse, which lets you share your location with contacts, ESPN Cricinfo that keeps you remain updated with scores, MapMyIndia to explore new attractions and Burrp to discover new food destinations.

Another interesting new feature which is unheard of in this segment is the MyKey technology available with the SYNC system. This system lets the owners program the key that limits the top speed of the car, music volume, prevents switching TCS off and also ensures the usage of seatbelt by turning off the audio system unless the driver wears the seatbelt. So if you don’t want your car to be mishandled by some other driver then you can programme the key, which offers great peace of mind. The Trend and Titanium variants don’t offer SYNC system and instead come with an innovative MyFord Dock feature. There is a small compartment on the top of the dashboard, where you can mount your phone and charge it with the USB port placed in the same compartment and also the AUX port for music connectivity. This way you can easily access your phone’s navigation system too without fumbling with the device.

The quality inside the cabin is good and never does it feel cheap or built to a cost. The doors are heavy and the car has solid build quality. The controls have a tactile feel, the air vents (none at the rear but the AC is a chiller), audio controls, climate control knobs, window switches, etc. feel built to last. There are more than 20 smart storage spaces inside the cabin to make the cabin look neat and tidy. The front door pockets can hold two bottles including a 1.5-litre and a 1.0-litre bottle with still some extra space left for more things. Then there is the sizeable glovebox with a neat pen holder. Just below the audio system there is a convenient place to park your phone that has rubberised material to keep it in place. Between the front seats there is a compartment that gets three cup holders, coin storage and a bin for the rear passengers. The one we liked the most is a secret side compartment, which is only accessible when the driver’s door is open. There are no door pockets for the rear but there are seatback pockets for newspapers and magazines and a parcel shelf at the back with carved out space to keep tissue boxes and similar stuff. There are no grab handles on the Titanium + trim because of six airbags but other variants get it. There are cabin lights for front passengers but missing for the rear.

Ford Figo Aspire Engine & Performance

The 1.2-litre Petrol engine for the Figo Aspire is based on the same motor that powers the petrol variant of the Figo hatchback that we all know of . However, for the Aspire, this four-cylinder, naturally-aspirated unit has got some major revisions in favour of enhanced fuel economy and performance. This Twin Independent Variable Camshaft Timing (Ti-VCT) equipped engine is sufficiently refined and revs rather freely. However, low-end performance is not its forte and frequent gearshifts are a must in situations like stop-go traffic. It is on the highways where this motor really impresses. The engine makes for quite a sprightly performer and there’s so much juice on offer towards the top-end of the rev-range that one would be hard pressed to not keep this engine on the boil. Top speed, at above 170 km/h, is nothing short of impressive for a sub-4m compact sedan and even the in-gear acceleration is pretty good. The gearshifts, too, are precise and the shift-action is smooth.

However, among the two engine variants that we drove, it is the 1.5-litre Diesel version that was more enjoyable. This is the same 1.5-litre turbo’ed oil-burner that does duty on the Fiesta and the EcoSport, but has been re-tuned for the Aspire to churn out a maximum power of 100 PS. This might have been done to match the Amaze’s segment-leading power of 100 PS, but what sets the Aspire apart is the way the motor goes on about its business. The turbo lag is minimal and come 1400 rpm, and the Aspire Diesel charges forward with almost a ferocious velocity. The torque is well spread throughout the rev-range and pushing this car to its limit is just too much fun. We recorded a speedo-indicated 185 km/h, which, when compared to the Amaze-D’s top whack of 145 km/h, feels rather stratospheric! The diesel variant is equally athletic even lower down the revs and doesn’t break sweat even when chugging along at 40 km/h in fourth gear, with the tacho needle hovering at a leisurely 1100 rpm. Akin to the petrol variant, gearshifts are precise and the clutch action is light. The NVH levels could have been a bit lower, but frankly, we are almost nitpicking here.

Ford Figo Aspire Ride & Handling

When it comes to ride and handling, comfort is clearly a focus area with the Aspire. The suspension is quite plush and absorbent and bumps are ridden over so well that you stop paying attention to every pimple on the road and makes driving a bit more relaxed. On really bad sections of road, the ride does get a bit jiggly and bouncy, which is when you detect a hint of stiffness, but that’s only to be expected. What makes ride quality even nicer is that the suspension works quite silently for the most part. For information on contact details of Ford car dealers in Kolkata

Yes, it does mildly enjoy being driven hard and responds better the more you load up the suspension. But, that effortless grip, unimpeachable confidence and precise steering you get on Fords like the Fiesta is missing here. There’s a strange looseness in the steering around the straight ahead position it doesn’t have the same agility as other Fords and body roll is ever-present. The petrol version is the better of the two Aspires in the corners with a touch more on-centre steering feel and correspondingly a greater feeling of connection with the car. The brakes on both petrol and diesel Aspires, however, inspire tremendous confidence; stopping power was impressive as well and that lends a lot to the overall driving experience

Ford Figo Aspire Safety & Security

The Ford Figo Aspire as expected comes loaded with all the possible gadgets that one might expect from a car in this category and then some. You obviously get Bluetooth telephony, an integrated audio infotainment system with phone controls and steering mounted audio controls. You also get a height adjustable steering wheel and driver’s seat along with electronically adjustable outside rear view mirrors with an electric folding option.

Ford has also taken an interesting approach to a smartphone mounting dock and integrated it well into the central dashboard architecture. You also get what Ford calls a MyKey which is essentially is like a central control over system settings like the speed limiter, seatbelt reminder and the infotainment volume limiter. The Ford Figo Aspire also comes with an automatic climate control and Ford’s SYNC applink that integrates your smart phone or tablet with the infotainment system.

What really does impress us the most though are the safety features that the Ford Figo Aspire comes with. All versions of the Aspire come standard with ABS and two airbags. The top of the line Aspire on the other hand comes with a staggering six airbags which is a first for a car in this segment. The Figo also comes with additional features like hill start control, which too is a first in its class.

Ford Figo Aspire Price in Chennai

Ford Figo Aspire Ex-Showroom Price in Chennai ranges from 5,47,286/- (Figo Aspire 1.2P Ambiente MT) to 8,10,611/- (Figo Aspire 1.5D Titanium Plus MT). Get best offers for Ford Figo Aspire from Ford Dealers in Chennai

Ford Figo Aspire Bottomline

Ford may have been late to the compact sedan segment but it’s used its time well. Sure, the Aspire may not be as special to drive as other Fords (including the Classic it is to replace) but it does offer everything to help it appeal to a wide buyer base. Ford has clearly spent a lot of money to give buyers what they want, be it in terms of newer concerns as connectivity and safety or in traditional requirements of space, comfort and efficiency.Assuming the Figo Aspire is priced in close proximity to the current market leader, the Swift Dzire, as we’ve been led to believe, Ford’s all-new compact sedan could just become the new benchmark in the segment.

Datsun GO Facelift First Drive

Datsun GO Overview

Nissan is one of the most popular car companies in the world, known for offering well engineered products which rank high on quality and performance. Datsun on the other hand is owned by Nissan since a very long time and had its roots in the USA, where it was extremely popular in the 1980s (as Nissan exported vehicles to the States using the Datsun name, a mistake they regretted later which cost them $800 million ~ Rs. 5000 crores in the 1980s). The resurrection of the Datsun brand is Nissan’s way of targeting the mass market and on the onset, the idea seems bright. While most people might now know this but extensive Nissan bits will go into Datsun cars so you can expect the same good quality and reliability. The Datsun GO is the first product from the new badge (in its second coming) and we take a quick drive to judge if Nissan has got it right. Check for Nissan cars Price, Review, Features & Specs at CarzPrice

Datsun GO Exteriors

Similar is the case with the Indian car market. The sub 4-metre and the small size engine duty have made the business a bit too complicated for car manufacturers. Compact-size sedans and even SUVs are making their way, with some compromise. However, Datsun has introduced a larger hatch called as the Datsun GO+. It is being marketed as a compact utility vehicle and does it do that? We take it for a weekend camping trip and find out how much of the addition exists.

The PLUS stands for the larger boot and additional third row of seating. The Datsun GO+ is based on the GO, and it shows the striking resemblance. The fascia’s of both are the same and the body design is the same till the rear door. After which the belt line rises as you move towards the rear and even the wheel haunches are protuberant. The blacked-out door pillar after the rear door (C-pillar) has a lesser glass area and this makes it very prominent. The roof also gently slopes downwards towards the rear. The boot lid of the Datsun GO+ is a new body part and the tail lamps are the same as the GO. The rear bumper looks stylish and does look muscular.

The length of the Datsun GO is under 4 metres, so it is as long as the Honda Amaze and Maruti Suzuki Swift DZire. However, what this offers is extra flexibility with another row of seating or a humongous boot, when compared to the compact sedans and SUVs. As the ground clearance is the same, it drives like any other compact car and is easy to manoeuvre through tight city lanes with a turning radius of 4.6 metres.

Datsun GO Interiors

All that size of the Go translates to a spacious cabin. But of course you will have to overcome the cheapness you will feel as soon as you enter. Don’t get us wrong, the build quality and the way things are put together are on par with the segment but the Hyundai Eon feels Eons better, pun intended. Apart from that, things like the non-retractable rear seat belts, thin seats and uncovered glove box open up the question of how much cost-cutting went in the car.The interiors get a grey layout with a lighter shade of grey for the bottom of the dashboard. The over design of the dashboard is very simple and many things like the indicator stalks, AC vents etc are borrowed from Nissan Micra.A very simple instrument cluster comprises of a very large speedometer (no tachometer) and a MID. The MID offers a wide range of information like tachometer, odometer, tripmeter, distance to empty and average fuel economy.

Though simple, the steering wheel is of nice size and feels light. The horn pad is big but the horn itself is a poor sounding single unit. The gear lever and the handbrake find their place on the dashboard instead of the conventional in-between the seats one. Though the gear lever is ergonomic once you get used to it, many will not like the placement of the gear lever and the old style pull and twist handbrake.The centre console gets two AC vents, an unusual audio setup and HVAC controls below. The switches and knobs are of good size and quality. The glove box is deep but comes without a closing lid. The same thing happened with the Nissan Evalia, which later got one, but the Go comes open only. Other storage spaces include smaller cubby holes under the steering wheel (none of them are closed) and bottle holders on the front doors.

Coming to the seat setup, the Datsun gets a connected seat, which is almost bench type seats you get in old HM Ambassadors. You can’t seat another person as there is neither the space nor any seatbelt. Datsun has said that this space can be used for storage space which sort of defeats the purpose of having a ‘seat’ and not usable cubby holes.Though the seats are thin, they offer good support. Having the longest wheelbase in its segment (longer than some in a segment above too), the Go offers excellent space, especially in the rear. Three adults can travel in reasonable comfort in the rear, when compared to the constricted space of the competition.

Datsun GO Engine

Powering the Datsun GO is the de-tuned 1.2-litre, 3-pot motor from the petrol Micra which outputs 68 PS of power at 5000 RPM (the same engine in the Micra makes 76 PS at 6000 RPM) and 104 Nm of torque at 4000 RPM. This engine is relatively smooth for a 3-cylinder mill and the light weight helps it gather good pace quickly. Mid-range is strong and the engine keeps charging, losing steam sharply in the top-end as the rev-limiter cuts in too early at just 5200 RPM. Near the rev limit, the motor is filled with vibrations, buzzing in despair but in spite of the 3-pot configuration, the motor has good NVH throughout the power band with on idle vibes being the major achilles heel. The vibrations are more when the AC is switched off as the engine RPM reduces.

In fact the tuning done on the engine of the Datsun GO is so much better than the Nissan Micra that you really don’t put the 3-cylinder motor in inferior hardware category. In spite of the modest horse power, the GO is quite fast with 0-100 km/hr coming up in 14 seconds, aided by its light weight and good power to weight ratio. Not only can you potter around town in higher gears with comfort, you can also cruise on the highways without the engine feeling uneasy. The 5-speed gearbox has decent shift quality although it feels a bit notchy but the clutch is light. The ARAI claimed mileage for the Datsun GO is 20.6 km/l which is better than the Micra even though it is equipped with the same motor. Expect real world mileage to be around 15 km/l, making the Datsun GO quite frugal. For information on contact details of Datsun car dealers in India

Datsun GO Ride & Handling

The Datsun Go handles almost all the irregularities of the Indian roads pretty well with only the large pot holes giving it the wobble. The suspension does a nice job of absorbing them but the absence of any kind of insulation means even though you won’t feel the smallest of the disturbances of the roads, you will hear them.The light steering is good for the city driving and gains good weight on the highways at higher speeds. Straight line stability is good but an upgrade for the tyres is strictly recommended. Braking is satisfactory but without ABS, sudden braking made both the car and us nervous.

Datsun GO Safety

Safety is one of the main priorities of many Indian consumers especially when they are choosing a car for their entire family. For your information the Datsun GO will disappoint you once again here because quite frankly it lacks lot of safety features which you would normally expect out of your family hatch.The Go does not have any provision of a airbag in any of its variants. Although it has been provided with disc brakes at the front but there is no ABS option either in the car. So if you are concerned about all these safety measures then we are afraid that Datsun GO won’t provide you with any.

Datsun GO Price In Hyderabad

Datsun Go Ex-Showroom Price in Hyderabad ranges from 3,27,528/- (Go D) to 4,27,786/- (Go T Optional). Get best offers for Datsun Go from Datsun Dealers in Hyderabad

Datsun GO Bottomline

One has to admit that the Datsun GO has to face tough competition from its peers. However, it has managed to carve out a niche for itself in the Tier 2 and Tier 3 cities in India. The unavailability of the Datsun GO diesel variant can prove a disadvantage. However, the Datsun GO petrol models have the ability to hold their heads high amidst heavy competition.

Datsun GO Exteriors

Similar is the case with the Indian car market. The sub 4-metre and the small size engine duty have made the business a bit too complicated for car manufacturers. Compact-size sedans and even SUVs are making their way, with some compromise. However, Datsun has introduced a larger hatch called as the Datsun GO+. It is being marketed as a compact utility vehicle and does it do that? We take it for a weekend camping trip and find out how much of the addition exists.

The PLUS stands for the larger boot and additional third row of seating. The Datsun GO+ is based on the GO, and it shows the striking resemblance. The fascia’s of both are the same and the body design is the same till the rear door. After which the belt line rises as you move towards the rear and even the wheel haunches are protuberant. The blacked-out door pillar after the rear door (C-pillar) has a lesser glass area and this makes it very prominent. The roof also gently slopes downwards towards the rear. The boot lid of the Datsun GO+ is a new body part and the tail lamps are the same as the GO. The rear bumper looks stylish and does look muscular.

The length of the Datsun GO+ is under 4 metres, so it is as long as the Honda Amaze and Maruti Suzuki Swift DZire. However, what this offers is extra flexibility with another row of seating or a humongous boot, when compared to the compact sedans and SUVs. As the ground clearance is the same, it drives like any other compact car and is easy to manoeuvre through tight city lanes with a turning radius of 4.6 metres.

Datsun GO Interiors

All that size of the Go translates to a spacious cabin. But of course you will have to overcome the cheapness you will feel as soon as you enter. Don’t get us wrong, the build quality and the way things are put together are on par with the segment but the Hyundai Eon feels Eons better, pun intended. Apart from that, things like the non-retractable rear seat belts, thin seats and uncovered glove box open up the question of how much cost-cutting went in the car.The interiors get a grey layout with a lighter shade of grey for the bottom of the dashboard. The over design of the dashboard is very simple and many things like the indicator stalks, AC vents etc are borrowed from Nissan Micra.A very simple instrument cluster comprises of a very large speedometer (no tachometer) and a MID. The MID offers a wide range of information like tachometer, odometer, tripmeter, distance to empty and average fuel economy.

Though simple, the steering wheel is of nice size and feels light. The horn pad is big but the horn itself is a poor sounding single unit. The gear lever and the handbrake find their place on the dashboard instead of the conventional in-between the seats one. Though the gear lever is ergonomic once you get used to it, many will not like the placement of the gear lever and the old style pull and twist handbrake.The centre console gets two AC vents, an unusual audio setup and HVAC controls below. The switches and knobs are of good size and quality. The glove box is deep but comes without a closing lid. The same thing happened with the Nissan Evalia, which later got one, but the Go comes open only. Other storage spaces include smaller cubby holes under the steering wheel (none of them are closed) and bottle holders on the front doors.

Coming to the seat setup, the Datsun gets a connected seat, which is almost bench type seats you get in old HM Ambassadors. You can’t seat another person as there is neither the space nor any seatbelt. Datsun has said that this space can be used for storage space which sort of defeats the purpose of having a ‘seat’ and not usable cubby holes.Though the seats are thin, they offer good support. Having the longest wheelbase in its segment (longer than some in a segment above too), the Go offers excellent space, especially in the rear. Three adults can travel in reasonable comfort in the rear, when compared to the constricted space of the competition.

Datsun GO Engine

Powering the Datsun GO is the de-tuned 1.2-litre, 3-pot motor from the petrol Micra which outputs 68 PS of power at 5000 RPM (the same engine in the Micra makes 76 PS at 6000 RPM) and 104 Nm of torque at 4000 RPM. This engine is relatively smooth for a 3-cylinder mill and the light weight helps it gather good pace quickly. Mid-range is strong and the engine keeps charging, losing steam sharply in the top-end as the rev-limiter cuts in too early at just 5200 RPM. Near the rev limit, the motor is filled with vibrations, buzzing in despair but in spite of the 3-pot configuration, the motor has good NVH throughout the power band with on idle vibes being the major achilles heel. The vibrations are more when the AC is switched off as the engine RPM reduces.

In fact the tuning done on the engine of the Datsun GO is so much better than the Nissan Micra that you really don’t put the 3-cylinder motor in inferior hardware category. In spite of the modest horse power, the GO is quite fast with 0-100 km/hr coming up in 14 seconds, aided by its light weight and good power to weight ratio. Not only can you potter around town in higher gears with comfort, you can also cruise on the highways without the engine feeling uneasy. The 5-speed gearbox has decent shift quality although it feels a bit notchy but the clutch is light. The ARAI claimed mileage for the Datsun GO is 20.6 km/l which is better than the Micra even though it is equipped with the same motor. Expect real world mileage to be around 15 km/l, making the Datsun GO quite frugal.

Datsun GO Ride & Handling

The Datsun Go handles almost all the irregularities of the Indian roads pretty well with only the large pot holes giving it the wobble. The suspension does a nice job of absorbing them but the absence of any kind of insulation means even though you won’t feel the smallest of the disturbances of the roads, you will hear them.The light steering is good for the city driving and gains good weight on the highways at higher speeds. Straight line stability is good but an upgrade for the tyres is strictly recommended. Braking is satisfactory but without ABS, sudden braking made both the car and us nervous.

Datsun GO Safety

Safety is one of the main priorities of many Indian consumers especially when they are choosing a car for their entire family. For your information the Datsun GO will disappoint you once again here because quite frankly it lacks lot of safety features which you would normally expect out of your family hatch.The Go does not have any provision of a airbag in any of its variants. Although it has been provided with disc brakes at the front but there is no ABS option either in the car. So if you are concerned about all these safety measures then we are afraid that Datsun GO won’t provide you with any.

Datsun GO Price In Hyderabad

Datsun Go Ex-Showroom Price in Hyderabad ranges from 3,27,528/- (Go D) to 4,27,786/- (Go T Optional). Get best offers for Datsun Go from Datsun Dealers in Hyderabad

Datsun GO Bottomline

One has to admit that the Datsun GO has to face tough competition from its peers. However, it has managed to carve out a niche for itself in the Tier 2 and Tier 3 cities in India. The unavailability of the Datsun GO diesel variant can prove a disadvantage. However, the Datsun GO petrol models have the ability to hold their heads high amidst heavy competition.

Datsun GO Exteriors

Similar is the case with the Indian car market. The sub 4-metre and the small size engine duty have made the business a bit too complicated for car manufacturers. Compact-size sedans and even SUVs are making their way, with some compromise. However, Datsun has introduced a larger hatch called as the Datsun GO+. It is being marketed as a compact utility vehicle and does it do that? We take it for a weekend camping trip and find out how much of the addition exists.

The PLUS stands for the larger boot and additional third row of seating. The Datsun GO+ is based on the GO, and it shows the striking resemblance. The fascia’s of both are the same and the body design is the same till the rear door. After which the belt line rises as you move towards the rear and even the wheel haunches are protuberant. The blacked-out door pillar after the rear door (C-pillar) has a lesser glass area and this makes it very prominent. The roof also gently slopes downwards towards the rear. The boot lid of the Datsun GO+ is a new body part and the tail lamps are the same as the GO. The rear bumper looks stylish and does look muscular.

The length of the Datsun GO+ is under 4 metres, so it is as long as the Honda Amaze and Maruti Suzuki Swift DZire. However, what this offers is extra flexibility with another row of seating or a humongous boot, when compared to the compact sedans and SUVs. As the ground clearance is the same, it drives like any other compact car and is easy to manoeuvre through tight city lanes with a turning radius of 4.6 metres.

Datsun GO Interiors

All that size of the Go translates to a spacious cabin. But of course you will have to overcome the cheapness you will feel as soon as you enter. Don’t get us wrong, the build quality and the way things are put together are on par with the segment but the Hyundai Eon feels Eons better, pun intended. Apart from that, things like the non-retractable rear seat belts, thin seats and uncovered glove box open up the question of how much cost-cutting went in the car.The interiors get a grey layout with a lighter shade of grey for the bottom of the dashboard. The over design of the dashboard is very simple and many things like the indicator stalks, AC vents etc are borrowed from Nissan Micra.A very simple instrument cluster comprises of a very large speedometer (no tachometer) and a MID. The MID offers a wide range of information like tachometer, odometer, tripmeter, distance to empty and average fuel economy.

Though simple, the steering wheel is of nice size and feels light. The horn pad is big but the horn itself is a poor sounding single unit. The gear lever and the handbrake find their place on the dashboard instead of the conventional in-between the seats one. Though the gear lever is ergonomic once you get used to it, many will not like the placement of the gear lever and the old style pull and twist handbrake.The centre console gets two AC vents, an unusual audio setup and HVAC controls below. The switches and knobs are of good size and quality. The glove box is deep but comes without a closing lid. The same thing happened with the Nissan Evalia, which later got one, but the Go comes open only. Other storage spaces include smaller cubby holes under the steering wheel (none of them are closed) and bottle holders on the front doors.

Coming to the seat setup, the Datsun gets a connected seat, which is almost bench type seats you get in old HM Ambassadors. You can’t seat another person as there is neither the space nor any seatbelt. Datsun has said that this space can be used for storage space which sort of defeats the purpose of having a ‘seat’ and not usable cubby holes.Though the seats are thin, they offer good support. Having the longest wheelbase in its segment (longer than some in a segment above too), the Go offers excellent space, especially in the rear. Three adults can travel in reasonable comfort in the rear, when compared to the constricted space of the competition.

Datsun GO Engine

Powering the Datsun GO is the de-tuned 1.2-litre, 3-pot motor from the petrol Micra which outputs 68 PS of power at 5000 RPM (the same engine in the Micra makes 76 PS at 6000 RPM) and 104 Nm of torque at 4000 RPM. This engine is relatively smooth for a 3-cylinder mill and the light weight helps it gather good pace quickly. Mid-range is strong and the engine keeps charging, losing steam sharply in the top-end as the rev-limiter cuts in too early at just 5200 RPM. Near the rev limit, the motor is filled with vibrations, buzzing in despair but in spite of the 3-pot configuration, the motor has good NVH throughout the power band with on idle vibes being the major achilles heel. The vibrations are more when the AC is switched off as the engine RPM reduces.

In fact the tuning done on the engine of the Datsun GO is so much better than the Nissan Micra that you really don’t put the 3-cylinder motor in inferior hardware category. In spite of the modest horse power, the GO is quite fast with 0-100 km/hr coming up in 14 seconds, aided by its light weight and good power to weight ratio. Not only can you potter around town in higher gears with comfort, you can also cruise on the highways without the engine feeling uneasy. The 5-speed gearbox has decent shift quality although it feels a bit notchy but the clutch is light. The ARAI claimed mileage for the Datsun GO is 20.6 km/l which is better than the Micra even though it is equipped with the same motor. Expect real world mileage to be around 15 km/l, making the Datsun GO quite frugal.

Datsun GO Ride & Handling

The Datsun Go handles almost all the irregularities of the Indian roads pretty well with only the large pot holes giving it the wobble. The suspension does a nice job of absorbing them but the absence of any kind of insulation means even though you won’t feel the smallest of the disturbances of the roads, you will hear them.The light steering is good for the city driving and gains good weight on the highways at higher speeds. Straight line stability is good but an upgrade for the tyres is strictly recommended. Braking is satisfactory but without ABS, sudden braking made both the car and us nervous.

Datsun GO Safety

Safety is one of the main priorities of many Indian consumers especially when they are choosing a car for their entire family. For your information the Datsun GO will disappoint you once again here because quite frankly it lacks lot of safety features which you would normally expect out of your family hatch.The Go does not have any provision of a airbag in any of its variants. Although it has been provided with disc brakes at the front but there is no ABS option either in the car. So if you are concerned about all these safety measures then we are afraid that Datsun GO won’t provide you with any.

Datsun GO Price In Hyderabad

Datsun Go Ex-Showroom Price in Hyderabad ranges from 3,27,528/- (Go D) to 4,27,786/- (Go T Optional). Get best offers for Datsun Go from Datsun Dealers in Hyderabad

Datsun GO Bottomline

One has to admit that the Datsun GO has to face tough competition from its peers. However, it has managed to carve out a niche for itself in the Tier 2 and Tier 3 cities in India. The unavailability of the Datsun GO diesel variant can prove a disadvantage. However, the Datsun GO petrol models have the ability to hold their heads high amidst heavy competition.

Maruti Suzuki Dzire Hatchback Overview

Maruti Suzuki Dzire Overview

Being a niche sub-segment which was born out of the urge to take advantage of a local tax regulation, the development of every compact entry sedan was always going to be a bit of ‘jugaad’ engineering. In a way, it is a reflection of the collective Indian mindset considering our penchant for tax avoidance and our irrational acceptance of the sedan as an ‘aspirational’ body style. Check for Maruti cars On Road Price in New Delhi at CarzPrice

But a sub-four-metre sedan can’t be an optimal package because there is very little room to work with; and it would inevitably tend to be an ungainly variant of the hatchback on which it was built. Almost every compact sedan currently in the market has seemed uncomfortable in its skin. The outgoing Maruti Suzuki Dzire has been a prime example. The Swift was already not the best package in terms of the exterior dimensions to interior space leverage. And the shared hatchback design was too overpowering even in the second gen Dzire sedan. But both these facets of the Dzire will change with the introduction of the new 2017 model

Maruti Suzuki Dzire Design & Style

The new Maruti Suzuki Dzire is based on the next generation Swift that should come to India by the end of FY 2017-18. However it’s only the front that it borrows from the hatchback, and of course, the platform as well. Unlike the previous generations, the new Dzire is a completely different car from the new Swift A-pillar onwards. Also Read – Maruti Suzuki Dzire vs Baleno vs Brezza

The countenance is purposeful with muscle at the right places on the bonnet and the wheel arches. The hexagonal front grille is also short and wide, and it all adds to make the Dzire look broad. Chrome work is generous on the front grille, below the fog lamp housing and even in the headlamp unit, but it doesn’t look overdone. In fact, the quality of chrome is so good that it would match the finish on cars twice its price. Unfortunately, Maruti Suzuki offers LED projectors and DRLs on the top ZXi+ variant only, so the lower variants get reflector headlamp units that tone down the aggression a bit

The muscle on the bonnet is carried on to the front fender and a sharp shoulder line weaves through from the front to the rear. A pinched character line at the lower end breaks the monotony of what would otherwise be a plain design. The A-pillar onwards, the Dzire looks more sedan-like in profile with the roof flowing from the A-pillar to the C-pillar smoothly. The proportions are better too, as Maruti Suzuki has increased the width by 40mm and reduced the roof height by 40mm. However, the ground clearance is reduced only by by 7mm, down to 163mm now. So, while the Dzire will tackle the speed breakers of different sizes with ease, sharp gradient changes may require you to double check the front overhang before committing to them. Also Read – Maruti Dzire Vs Sub-Four Metre Rivals – Spec

Unlike the front design that imparts the Dzire a big-car appeal, the rear is usual business as far as compact car designs go. Nonetheless, it is a step forward as the boot is now better integrated into the C-pillar and doesn’t look like an afterthought. It’s stubby with the bumper hardly extending any mass beyond the boot lid. The arc-shaped lip is Ciaz-like now. Importantly, the Dzire now not only looks proportionate but is also pleasing to the eye

Maruti Suzuki Dzire Cabin & comfort

Step inside the cabin of the new Dzire and one instantly realises that this isn’t the cabin of another Maruti Suzuki car with a few new bits but is an all-new design instead. The dual-tone dashboard comprises of a black top while the lower part is beige. The wood finish in the dashboard and in the lower part of the flat-bottomed steering wheel adds to the premium appeal of the cabin significantly. This makes the Dzire the second compact sedan to have a flat-bottomed steering wheel after the Volkswagen Ameo.

The touchscreen infotainment system in the centre console looks similar to the one seen on the Baleno and Vitara Brezza but has a different housing. It’s different in terms of functionality as well and comes with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. It has the usual SD Card -based navigation and connectivity options also include Bluetooth, USB and Aux-In. The system is easy to use and the simple user-interface means people with limited knowledge of smartphones to will not have problems operating it. There are two 12V power outlets too, one on the lower centre console and the other between the front seats. The door pockets in front and back can easily store one litre bottles and still leave space for a fair bit of small items.

The new Dzire is wider by 40 mm than the older model and has increased leg room and shoulder room too. With the driver’s seat adjusted for a person of 5 feet 8 inches, a six feet person was able to sit in the rear seat without his knees brushing against the front seats. The backrest incline angle of the bench is good, making it comfortable for longer journeys too. The under-thigh support will prove adequate for most people but for taller occupants, this could be a slight issue. The door armrests at the rear could do with a bit of fabric cushioning as the hard plastic can be a bit discomforting after a while. These, however, are minor issues, which do not make a considerable difference to the in-cabin experience.

In a nutshell, the interior of the new Dzire carries forward the premium positioning of the vehicle. It quite simply is the best cabin in the compact sedan segment in India from all aspects.

Maruti Suzuki Dzire Engine & Gearbox

The new Dzire carries over the same two powertrains from the previous generation. So, it is the same 1,197cc VVT petrol engine and the 1,248cc DDiS diesel engine with their 5-speed manual gearboxes. The powertrains get changes to their calibration and the automated manual transmission (AMT) makes an appearance in the Dzire. The AMT which we have seen in smaller Marutis is still the same basic tech involving sensors and hydraulic shifters mounted on top of the manual gearbox. The AMT’s relatively unrefined shifting characteristic is also, unfortunately, a carry-over. Unlike a torque converter or continuously variable (CVT) auto transmissions, AMTs tend to have prominent shift shocks during heavy acceleration. But, the head nodding pull during up shifts eases up during cruising speeds. Kick downs to lower gears when I stomp the throttle for an overtake maneuver also tend to be less urgent, but at slower speeds there is a double shift down from overdrive gears. With a lot of low-end torque being available, the diesel AMT was easier to use overall. Buyers have to be aware that the AMT tech is oriented towards optimising mileage in city driving cycles and so there is a certain inevitable performance compromise. For information on contact details of Maruti car dealers in Chennai

The petrol engine in the Dzire produces a peak power of 61kW at 6,000rpm and peak torque of 113Nm at 4,200rpm. This is a quiet, refined engine with its performance being an ideal combination for all types of driving cycles, My personal preference would be the manual transmission for both the petrol and diesel engines, but with more and more buyers preferring AMTs Maruti is now offering three trim variants each with the automated gearbox. The Dzire’s diesel engine delivers 55kW of power and 190Nm of torque. Peak torque is available from 2,000rpm. This common rail direct injection engine’s familiar character means that driving it in a Maruti is somehow always more pleasurable than in any other brand’s cars. It does get a bit raucous at high revs, but if you are a driver that loves to be connected with the car, this engine will keep you amply engaged.

The Bridgestone Ecopia 185/65 tyres that my test mule came with were shod on 15-inch alloys. While these tyres helped keep road rush to a minimum in the cabin, their relatively thin contact patch on the road meant lesser confidence while taking fast corners. However, straight line stability has improved dramatically and the Dzire now cruises confidently even at speeds of upto 160kmph

Maruti Suzuki Dzire Ride & Handling

Maruit Dzire has softened this car a bit and ride quality is noticeably better than the outgoing car. There are fewer body movements over bad sections of road and aren’t as jarring any more. It soaks up road imperfections in a very mature manner and feels nice and absorbent. The petrol’s steering is light and, with a tight 4.8m turning radius, it’s effortless to twirl around in the city. The return to centre is weak though, like many modern Marutis, and with all that lightness, it doesn’t feel as well connected to the road as before; there’s a bit of vagueness here. However, the diesel feels a bit heavier and more connected in company

Maruti Suzuki Dzire Braking & Safety

The safety features on offer include dual airbags, ABS with EBD and even brake assist. There is also ISOFIX on all the variants, which makes it a good option to consider. The other features on offer include the front seat belt with pre-tensioners, immobilizer, force limiter, seat belt warning lamps. Key left warning and door open warning are a part of this list.

(VXi/VDi) In the V variant, the additional features are day and night adjustable IRVM, speed sensitive door locking and anti-theft security system. (ZXi/ZDi) Z offers reverse parking sensor, front fog lamps, rear defogger as additional features. (ZXi+/ZDi+)

The Z+ also offers some additional features too. There is reverse camera with guide that is an extra over the Z variant

Maruti Suzuki Dzire Price In Hyderabad

Maruti Suzuki Dzire Ex-Showroom Price in Hyderabad ranges from 5,40,374/- (Dzire LXI) to 9,38,113/- (Dzire ZDI Plus AT). Get best offers for Maruti Suzuki Dzire from Maruti Suzuki Dealers in Hyderabad

Maruti Suzuki Dzire Verdict

Maruti, as ever, has its fingers on the pulse of the Indian market, and this new Dzire is tailor-made to cater to the demands and needs of customers. It’s got all the right ingredients – space, practicality, comfort, good equipment on top variants, fuel-efficient engines and, above everything, the backing of Maruti’s extensive sales and support network. Also, the inclusion of ABS with EBD, and dual airbags as standard across the range is an excellent move that’s sure to go down well with increasingly safety-conscious Indians. With a wide introductory price range of Rs 5.45-9.41 lakh (ex-showroom, Delhi), there should be a Dzire variant for everyone. There’s little doubt then, despite the rise of the compact SUV, and doubts about the longevity of this segment in the light of the upcoming GST implementation, that Maruti seems to have another blockbuster on its hand

Nissan Micra Hatchback Overview

Nissan Micra Overview

The new Nissan Micra is the upgraded version with new styling and comfort features. The exteriors have been given a facelift with new headlamp design, front grille with chrome in V-shape, electrically-foldable ORVMs and new diamond-cut alloy wheels with eight-spoke design. The interiors have been given a new Piano Black finish, chrome accents and orange finishes in the top variant. The dual airbags, ABS with EBD and BA, steering-mounted audio controls, and push button start/stop have been introduced as a standard.Check for Micra On Road Price in Hyderabad at CarzPrice

Nissan Micra Exterior

There are many visible changes on the outside with the Micra now looking completely transformed. The changes are not drastic but have been very well executed giving the Nissan Micra quite some appeal. The headlights are now pulled back (in line with Nissan’s new signature headlights) and the grille gets a thick chrome bar. The bumpers are new as well and the front bumper gets chrome on the lower half, right below the number plate. The dimensions have changed due to the new bumpers, with the facelifted car being 45 mm longer, however the wheelbase remains the same.

Gone are the soft touches of the old Micra and you can truly appreciate the changes when you look at the old and new Micra simultaneously. Notice how the new car looks so fresh and contemporary even though the body structure remains unchanged. Other changes to the styling of the vehicle include a new hood and front fenders. The fog lights get a chrome surround but oddly front fogs are only standard on the XV premium variant. The side profile reveals the new alloy wheels while the rear now sports LED tail lights (a segment first) and a new bumper with aggressive cuts. The tail gate is now slightly longer with the addition of a plastic part.

Two new colours make their debut on the facelifted Nissan Micra, both of which suit the car quite well. Overall Nissan has got the styling update quite spot on, which manages to shed the feminine image of the car to a large extent.Nissan is offering the Micra in seven variants, just like the existing model. The new Micra gets three petrol variants and four diesel variants. The company has offered most features mid-level variant onwards (like iKey and ABS). However the lower variants don’t get alloy wheels and run on 14-inch rubber. The chrome on the bumper is missing on them as well (as can be seen in the above images). The rear spoiler, front fog lights, side airbags and reverse camera are part of optional equipment

Nissan Micra Interior

The changes continue on the inside as well. The design of the dashboard remains almost the same as before but Nissan has made changes to colours and added more features as well. Gone are the multiple colours on the dash, which are replaced with a single colour. The centre console is all new and features piano black finish which looks much better than the silver/grey console found in the old model. The centre AC vents are no longer round and are instead rectangular in shape. The company has added a sea of features like steering mounted audio controls, Bluetooth audio system, climate control, electrically adjustable and folding outside rear view mirrors, reverse parking camera, 4 airbags, etc (most of these features are standard on the top-end XV Premium diesel variant only). Chrome and silver inserts are present on the dash as well as the doors.

Nissan has reshaped the seats for better support and cushioning and you feel extremely comfortable inside the car. The Micra has a twin glovebox setup along with an open storage space in between, however lower variants surprisingly get a single glovebox. The power outlet is placed on the lower left side of the centre console, which is not very convenient for the driver or rear passengers to use. Right above the bottom glove box there are ports for USB and Aux. When you open them, the ports are not placed in the same order as its written on the flap, a minor irritant but something which can cause trouble when you are connecting your phone or USB in the night.

Space inside the cabin is generous, even though the exterior dimensions will make you think otherwise. Nissan claims the headroom is the highest in its class. The driver’s seat gets height adjust and there is plenty of room to seat four adults in good comfort. Quality inside is good and everything feels decently put together with no rattles or squeaks. The rear seat offers good legroom but under thigh support could be better. The boot is decently big (no 60:40 here) and there are quite a few storage areas in the cabin as well. However there is no seat pocket behind the driver’s seat even though it’s present behind the co-driver’s seat.

Nissan Micra Engine & Transmission

There are two engine options available, 1.2-litre petrol engine that produces about 75bhp of power and the other option is the 1.5-litre diesel engine. This mill produces about 65bhp of power. The petrol comes only with a CVT option and the diesel has a 5-speed manual.The New Micra will be available with a choice of two powertrains – a 1.2-litre petrol engine mated to X-Tronic CVT Automatic transmission, or a 1.5-litre diesel paired with a 5-speed manual transmission. The petrol engine no longer gets the manual version as that has been made available on the Micra Active itself.The ARAI claimed figured for the Micra petrol is 19.03km/l, while that for diesel is 23.08 km/l. In the real world, the Micra petrol will return close to 12km/l in the city and 15km/l on the highway. On the other hand, the diesel should retun about 18km/l in the city and 20km/l on the highway.

Nissan Micra Performance and Handling

The quick responsive engine, and the CVT transmission with smooth changing of the speed and torques at the wheel ensure a pleasant experience of the drive. The minimum turning circle radius of 4.65m and the electric power-assisted rack and pinion steering system with steering-mounted controls for the music system ensure a comfortable driving experience at all road conditions. The suspension system has McPherson Struts at the front and torsion beam suspension at the rear designed to absorb the maximum of road shocks, keeping the occupants at great comfort.

Nissan Micra Braking and Safety

The Nissan Micra features ventilated discs at the front and drum brakes at the rear, and ABS with EBD and BA assist for safe handling on slippery surfaces. The safety feature of driver airbag is available in all variants and co-passenger airbag is available in the top variant only. The other safety features offered include central locking, speed-sensing auto door lock, seat belt warning, low fuel warning and engine immobilizer for safety against theft attempts.

Nissan Micra Price

Nissan Micra Ex-Showroom Price in India ranges from 5,97,075/- (Micra XL CVT) to 7,34,531/- (Micra DCI XL Comfort). Get best offers for Nissan Micra from Nissan Dealers in India

Nissan Micra Verdict

The facelifted Nissan Micra is a step in the right direction. The Japanese automaker has worked on improving quite a few aspects of their entry level car, which has worked very well. The new Micra looks quite appealing both inside-out and comes loaded with a host of features. While the Nissan Micra is not very rich when it comes to dynamics, it does offer a good balance of ride and handling for city driving. The Micra has always been an excellent car for the urban run and the update only makes it better.

Toyota Innova Crysta Engine & Peformance

Toyota Innova Crysta Overview

Toyota Innova Crysta 2016 is the latest edition of the famous Innova model with a facelift in exterior styling and luxurious interior features. The Innova Crysta variants are available in manual and automatic transmission versions, widening the options for customers. Currently, Innova Crysta variants are available as GX, GX Automatic, VX, ZX and ZX Automatic, with ZX as the top-end variant. Check Innova Crysta On Road price in Carzprice

Toyota Innova Crysta Exterior

The New Toyota Innova Crysta 2017 has increased in size and is larger than the earlier vehicle. It is taller and wider too. The MUV looks striking with the newly styled grille. The headlamps are large and sleek ones. This time they get projector lamps and daytime running LEDs. The headlamps look like a part of the grille. The lower grille is a glossy black one.

From the side, the Innova Crysta looks like a thorough MUV. It is boxy but Toyota has tried to keep it minimal. The galls are is smaller so the vehicle looks even bigger. The shoulder line rises towards the rear and though boxy, it looks stylish. It gets new 17-inch alloy wheels.

The rear is also completely different this time. the rear end seems inspired from the Land Cruiser.The taillamps are fang shaped ones and look stylish. It looks like an SUV from the rear. Toyota has tried hard to conceal the Innova’s boxy look buy giving it a lot of styling cues from its SUVs.

 Toyota Innova Crysta Interiors

The interiors of the new generation Toyota Innova is a massive leap ahead. The design is very elegant and more luxurious than before. Toyota has managed to fit in an entire piece of mould on the dashboard instead of assembling separate panels, which was a very challenging task for the engineers. It has a wave sort of pattern that emerges from the passenger side and enhances towards the driver’s console. Having said that, there is a 3D instrument cluster behind the steering wheel that looks fresh and gets a big informative MID screen. The steering wheel feels excellent to hold specially with the gloss wooden insert on top. It has all the controls for the infotainment system on either side and offers tilt and telescopic adjustment.

The Innova now gets a large touch-screen infotainment system which is integrated very well in the dashboard. It is quite user friendly and offers navigation system but unfortunately Toyota has missed out on Apple CarPlay, which is being offered on newer lot of cars (cheaper ones too) nowadays for better connectivity. The lower half of the centre console now houses a new automatic climate control that is quick in cooling the cabin. The quality and finish of the new Innova is excellent, it doesn’t feel like a Japanese car and instead has more of an European feel to it. All the switches and panels used feel robust and long lasting, which is a boon for buyers planning to use it for lakhs and lakhs of kilometres.

There are lots of storage bins inside, around 20 bottle holders! Every door can accommodate three 1-litre bottles each. There are two gloveboxes, the upper one is a cooled glovebox which can store two bottles. Also there are flip open cupholders for the front passenger and driver in front of the AC vents so you can keep your drinks chilled. Between the second row of seats there are two bottle holders that flip open, then there are these two trays that can hold a 00 ml bottle each. The last row also has cupholders and the ones on the right are chilled cupholders that can accommodate three of them. There is a good sense of space inside the cabin and at night the ambient lighting looks cool.

 The seats of the new Innova are very comfortable and wide. The seating is highly flexible and offers ample space for all the passengers. Second row seats have great legroom, headroom and shoulder room, which is much better than the outgoing model. There is a control for the chauffeur driven owners to adjust the front passenger seat from behind. There are a lot of convenience features like the second row also has auto climate control, the windows are one touch up/down, push button start, power foldable ORVMs, electric driver seat adjustment. The last row seats are good enough for kids but adults would only manage to sit for short stints because of the limited headroom. However, all three seatbelts at the back are proper ones and not lap seatbelts, which is a good aspect for safety. Even with the third row up you get a very practical and spacious boot while the third row has a 60:40 split and is highly flexible to accommodate cargo and passengers together easily for long routes. All-in-all, Toyota has nailed it this time with the interiors of the Innova getting a mix of Corolla quality and Camry design.

Toyota Innova Crysta Engine

The Innova Crysta 2017 gets a new 2.4-litre diesel engine which delivers 145bhp of power. This a more powerful engine than the earlier one and the NVH levels are also pretty low. There is always sufficient power available when required. One can drive easily in city without too many gearshifts and also on the highway, cruising comfortably. The torque spread is even.

 

There is another engine in the Innova Crysta, which is a 2.8-litre engine and this comes mated only to a six-speed automatic gearbox. This engine churns out 177bhp of power. This engine has excellent performance and the gearshifts too are very smooth.  The Innova Crysta also has a 2.7-litre petrol engine on offer with 164bhp of power. This engines come in both manual and automatic transmissions. The petrol is suitable if your city running is limited.

Toyota Innova Crysta Ride and Handling

The premium feel of the Innova Crysta is also in the way it drives. Though this vehicle has a ladder frame (subframe) chassis, it feels very comfortable. The ride remains composed and passes on minimal undulations of the road. The new chassis is even more stronger now. An improved suspension sees the ride quality improve a lot over the earlier vehicle, there is much less pitching and rolling now. Hence it is ideal for long distance travel.

At slow speed you can feel some thuds inside, but higher speeds its good. The steering wheel feel a bit heavy at parking speed. But as speeds rise, it gets better and a joy to hold and drive. The brakes are also very good and a progressive.  The all round visibility of the New Toyota Innova Crysta 2017 is excellent and one drives in a commanding portion.  The Innova Crysta is also a great vehicle to drive within the city. It has a tight turning radius hence taking sharp U-turns is a breeze. Even parking poses no problem

Toyota Innova Crysta Braking & Safety

The braking system of the Innova Crysta has front disc and rear drum brakes with anti-lock braking system as a standard in all variants. The Innova Crysta models have three airbags, one for the driver, one for the co-passenger and the third one for the knee of the driver. The top-end variant ZX has a front side and curtain airbags as additional safety features for the occupants.

Toyota Innova Crysta Conclusion

The Toyota Innova has mostly been seen as a people mover but was ageing and it showed. The new model excels on several fronts, it certainly looks more pleasing to the eyes, the interior is vastly improved in both aesthetics and comfort, the feature list has soared with a ton of equipment, including safety tech and the engines now pack in quite the punch. With a splendid ride quality on offer and Toyota’s known reliability and quality, the new Innova Crysta might be expensive but makes for the perfect vehicle under Rs. 30 lakhs for the family.